December 11, 2009 | by Tyrone Ford
Aiden Shaw on surviving porn, prostitution

To categorize Aiden Shaw as just a prostitute and porn star would be both lazy and obvious.

With more than 50 adult films to his name and years spent as a prostitute, he is approachable, intelligent and a survivor. Shaw was in Washington earlier this month to promote his newest book, “Sordid Truths: Selling My Innocence for a Taste of Stardom,” and appear at EFN Lounge/Motley Bar.

The owner of EFN Lounge, Bill Gray, said he asked Shaw to make an appearance at the establishment’s Friday night “Bearly CODE” happy hour.

“I didn’t want him to come and sign books,” Bill said. “I wanted him to just come and meet the guys of D.C., sign autographs — just socialize. He really fits in with the crowd that comes to Motley, so it really made sense.”

DC Agenda spoke with Aiden about his book, his time as a prostitute and more.

Agenda: In “Sordid Truths,” when describing the cross you’d made of “twigs and thorny red roses,” you make mention that you loved iconography and the passionate yet brutal imagery of Catholicism. Where do you believe this love stemmed from and do you still have it?

Shaw: I’ve always thought religious iconography was beautiful, even since I was a child. You see, to me it’s not about the beliefs behind it but the artistic beauty of the objects themselves.

Agenda: You say that while working as a prostitute, undressed, you felt less exposed, and that naked was your uniform. Were you always so comfortable in your skin? Were there ever instances where you were less sure?

Shaw: It’s funny about that. Some people think I may just walk around naked when I’m home, but you see when I’m by myself, I prefer to be clothed at all times — nearly to the point of showering in a bathing suit. But work is work, and being naked is the uniform for the job I was doing, and I was completely comfortable in that. Anyone who wears a uniform during the day for any job wants to change out of it as soon as the day is done, don’t they? I can say the same thing: That [after] being naked all day, it’s nice to just have the clothes back on while not working.

Agenda: There are some instances in the book where you discuss not knowing or sharing certain pieces of information about people in your life. Do you think this was done partly on a subconscious level to keep anyone from getting too close to you?

Shaw: I can see how it may seem like that there could be a great bit of sub context, however, unfortunately, it just wasn’t that deep. To be truthful, we never thought of things like that at the time. It’s just how things were at the time, due to all the drugs — not to mention information wasn’t available like it is now. Everyone has a cell phone now, when back then if you wanted to reach someone you needed to make an effort.

Agenda: You make reference to reading “The Happy Prince” by Oscar Wilde whenever you felt unsure of yourself. What part of the story do you identify most with? Is this something you still practice?

Shaw: Absolutely. It’s timeless and I believe it will always affect me. I always recommend everyone read it at least once.

Agenda: Towards the end of the book, you write, “Just say no to dealing drugs, not taking them.” You stated at your book signing that you are now sober. Has your opinion changed on this topic?

Shaw: “What the real problem is with most people is they become addicted. Addiction is the real problem, not necessarily the usage. Not that I’m condoning the usage, but the real problems begin when any addiction takes over.”

Agenda: When you tested positive for HIV, what was your reaction? How well did you handle it?

Shaw: I handled it as well as can be expected. It’s not like it was any big surprise to me, so I just carried on.

Agenda: Why did you decide to go public about your HIV status?

Shaw: I have never withheld the truth about anything, so this was no different. I was surrounded by supportive people, like Chi Chi LaRue, who all were incredible.

Agenda: Looking back on your film career, are there any that meant the most to you?

Shaw: I can’t really say any one film meant the most to me. Really, each film was just publicity, which is really what it’s all about. The more I got my name and face out there, the better off I was.

Agenda: What are your thoughts on today’s young gay guys in the adult film industry?

Shaw: I don’t really watch much of it, to be honest. Who is good and who isn’t is such a personal choice depending on what you find sexy. I find the demeanor of someone far more attractive, the way he looks at me, or holds his mouth in a particular way, than any one physical trait.

Comments are closed
© Copyright Brown, Naff, Pitts Omnimedia, Inc. 2014. All rights reserved.
Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin