Connect with us

Theater

‘Yerma’s’ yearning

Work of gay ’30s playwright revived at Gala

Published

on

Yerma, gay news, Washington Blade
Yerma, gay news, Washington Blade

Mabel del Poza, center, as the title character in ‘Yerma.’ Gala’s smart production never veers into melodrama. (Photo by Lonnie Tague; courtesy Gala)

‘Yerma’

 

Through Oct. 4

 

Gala Hispanic Theatre

 

3333 14th St. NW

 

$20-42.

 

202- 234-7174

 

Federico García Lorca didn’t stand a chance. When Franco’s fascist troops rose to power during the Spanish Civil War, there was no place for a freethinking, gay dramatist — internationally acclaimed and critical of the opposition — in their nationalist plan. So in August of 1936, one of Franco’s death squads abducted Lorca and shot him to death. He was 38.

And though Lorca’s body was never recovered, his works endure. His most important plays are tragedies featuring strong and complex women: “Blood Wedding” (1933), “Yerma” (1934) and “The House of Bernarda Alba” (1936). All set in the Spanish countryside, they’re collectively dubbed Lorca’s rural trilogy.

And now Gala Hispanic Theatre mounts a searing, modern-feeling “Yerma” (translates as “Barren”) helmed by out Spanish director José Luis Arellano García. The title character longs for a baby but can’t conceive. She blames her husband whom she rightly assumes doesn’t want children, a desire that’s anathema to both her and the surrounding villagers: A woman from the country who doesn’t bear children is as useless as a handful of thorns — even sinful!”

Director García makes us feel Yerma’s unrelenting pain. Even during intermission, a miserable family dinner plays out on stage. Yerma is collapsed at the kitchen table while her husband and his two shrouded sisters eat in silence except for the clanging of metal spoons against ceramic bowls. It’s a stylized production that somehow never crosses over to melodrama.

The script and set add to the intensity. In his world premier adaptation of Lorca’s luminously poetic text, Fernando J. Lopez, a Spanish writer who is gay, effectively pares a larger cast down to its five essential characters (not counting the sisters who appear briefly): Yerma; her husband, Juan; Victor, a lusty shepherd; new mother Maria; and Dolores, an amalgam older woman character.

Scenic designer Sylvia de Marta serves up a stark set of corrugated metal and stainless steel. A swathe of dirt (in which the actors sometimes flail and roll) borders the front of the stage. The set is lit with alternating soft and harsh fluorescent lighting. The actors are costumed in contemporary, very casual summer clothes.

Mabel del Pozo’s Yerma is passionate, definitely earthy, and generally miserable. Though not exactly clawing, her hands are never far from her loins. Yerma wants a baby badly. She communes with the unborn son she desires, sometimes speaking aloud to him. She believes his addition to the household would fix her otherwise unhappy life.

There are two men in Yerma’s life — Juan (played by out actor Eric Robledo) the cold husband that her father chose for her. By day he works the land and at night counts his money. Yerma is too much for Juan. He’d prefer a contented wife who remained quietly in the home and didn’t nag him about lovemaking and ways to conceive.

Then there is Victor (Iker Lastra), a family friend with whom Yerma steals charged but chaste moments.

The players are well cast. With a dancer’s poise, Natalia Miranda-Guzmán assays Yerma’s friend Maria, an ambivalent young mother who so easily conceived but was never eager to start a family. A sad moment comes when Yerma poignantly and enviously notes that Maria’s new baby has his mother’s eyes. And Dolores, a freewheeling mother many times over is played by Luz Nicolás who unbeknownst to last Friday’s audience was performing on a newly broken foot.

“Yerma” is performed in Spanish with gracefully translated, easy-to-read English surtitles.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Theater

‘Doña Rosita’ marks reunion of three Spaniards at GALA

An excellent cast and dynamic staging elevate stellar production

Published

on

Ariel Texidó and Mabel del Pozo in Doña Rosita la soltera. (Photo by Daniel Martínez)

Doña Rosita la soltera
Through Oct. 3
GALA Hispanic Theatre
3333 14th Street, NW
$35-$48
galatheatre.org

In the 1930s, Federico García Lorca, 20th century Spain’s greatest poet and dramatist, was writing plays about a woman’s place in the world. In fact, Lorca, who was gay, was exploring women’s souls in an unprecedented way for Spain, or anywhere really. His insight is frequently credited, in part, to his sexuality.  

Now at GALA Hispanic Theatre, Lorca’s “Doña Rosita la soltera (Doña Rosita the Spinster)” tells the story of Rosita, an unmarried woman who subsists on definite hopes of marrying a long-distance fiancé. Whether it’s to keep the populace at bay or to feed a romantic fantasy, isn’t completely clear, but years — decades, in fact — pass, and very little changes. 

Set in the conservative world of middle-class Granada (Lorca’s native province), the 100-minute play, performed in Spanish with English surtitles, spans the 1880s through the early 1900s, constrictive years for women in Spain. When Lorca wrote “Doña Rosita” in 1935, on the eve of the Spanish Civil War, he appreciated the recent gains made surrounding women’s rights and foresaw further, imminent progress. Then, just a year later at age 38 and at the top of his game, Lorca was unlawfully arrested and murdered by Franco’s rightwing thugs. All was lost. 

Adapted by out writer Nando López, GALA’s offering strays from Lorca’s original in various ways: there are fewer characters, and the older Rosita serves more as a narrator, interacting with her younger self. Lorca’s glorious poetry remains mostly intact. 

Still, the title character’s tale is clear: Orphaned as a child, Rosita (Mabel del Pozo) goes to live with her devoted aunt (Luz Nicolás) and uncle (Ariel Texidó), an avid gardener. As a young woman, she falls in love with her first cousin (also played by Texidó), and they’re engaged. Despite the fiancé leaving Spain to join his aging parents on their sizeable farm in Tucumán, Argentina, the young lovers remain betrothed. 

Domestic life goes on. With the support of relations, and the family’s devoted but skeptical housekeeper (Laura Alemán), Rosita assembles a first-rate trousseau, and the affianced pair continue to exchange heartfelt letters. At one point, there’s talk of marriage by proxy – an idea scoffed at by some of the household and neighbors. 

The sameness of the unchanging household is offset by out director José Luis Arellano’s dynamic staging, an excellent cast, actors nimbly changing characters onstage with the help of a hat or cravat fished out of a chest of drawers, Jesús Díaz Cortés’ vibrant lighting, and incidental music from David Peralto and Alberto Granados. Alemán, so good as the shrewd housekeeper from the country (a place Lorca respected) also assays a spinster who comes to tea. And Catherine Nunez characterizes feminine youth, scornful of Rosita’s unattached status. Delbis Cardona is versatile as the worker and Don Martin, a teacher charged with educating the ungrateful offspring of Granada’s rich. 

After a rare outdoor excursion to the circus, Rosita wrongly claims to have seen her would-be groom working with the troupe, but the housekeeper is quick to point out that the well-built puppeteer is by no means her stoop-shouldered barefoot fiancé, adding that more and more Rosita is seeing her faraway love in the face of the men about Granada. Swiftly, the aunt reminds the housekeeper to know her place – she’s allowed to speak, but not bark.

Visually, the passage of time is indicated by the hemline and cut of Rosita’s dresses (designed by Silvia de Marta), and the mid-play dismantling of the set (also de Marta), opening the family’s rooms and garden to what lies beyond. 

After intermission, six more years have passed and the narrative is more straightforward and patently compelling. Rosita’s aunt, now a pissed-off, generally miserable widow in reduced circumstances, is packing up to move. It’s been hard running a house, she says. And it’s harder scrubbing the floors, replies the faithful housekeeper. 

And it’s here that del Pozo shines with Rosita’s revelatory monologue, a searingly true, passionately delivered speech worth the price of a ticket. 

“Doña Rosita” marks a collaborative reunion of three Spaniards – writer López, director Arellano, and actor del Pozo – who all worked on GALA’s 2015, multi-Helen Hayes Award-winning production of Lorca’s politically controversial “Yerma,” the story of another complicated Spanish woman. 

GALA Hispanic Theatre safety policy

Continue Reading

Theater

Local theater comes back strong as in-person options abound

From Shakespeare to holiday fare, something for all tastes

Published

on

Levi Kreis is an out actor who plays Hermes in the national tour of ‘Hadestown’ soon opening at the Kennedy Center Opera House. (Photo courtesy of Kreis)

This time last year, theaters were scrambling to attract audiences – mostly with streaming and open-air performances. Like most seasons, results were mixed, but considering the challenges, it was a spectacular effort overall. While the pandemic hasn’t ended, many companies are reopening with in-person, indoor performances. Here’s a selection of offerings from some area theaters that are welcoming back audiences, provided patrons come both masked and with proof of vaccination. 

In Columbia Heights through Oct. 3, GALA Hispanic Theatre presents Federico García Lorca’s “Doña Rosita la soltera” (Doña Rosita the Spinster), performed in Spanish with English surtitles. An exploration of what the martyred gay playwright called “the grotesque treatment of women” in Spain, the 1935 work spans a decade of a woman’s life in a quickly modernizing society prior to the first World War. The source material is adapted by out playwright Nando López and the production is staged by out director José Luis Arellano who won a Helen Hayes Award in 2016 for staging GALA’s production of Lorca’s “Yerma,” the story of another woman. Galatheatre.org

On the Southwest Waterfront, Arena Stage has kicked off a busy fall season with “Toni Stone” (through Oct. 3). Written by Lydia R. Diamon, it’s the remarkable story of the first woman to play baseball in the Negro Leagues, also making her the first woman to play professionally in a men’s league in the 1950s. Santoya Fields stars in the title role, and Broadway’s Pam MacKinnon directs. Arenastage.org

Also, through Oct. 3, Round House Theatre presents “Quixote Nuevo,” Octavio Solis’ contemporary take on Cervantes’ classic directed by Lisa Portes. The playwright re-imagines knight Don Quixote as a professor whose fantasies take center stage in a Texas border town. Herbert Siguenza makes his Round House debut as Don Quixote/the professor.  

Next up, it’s the regional premiere of Lauren Yee’s “The Great Leap” (Nov. 10 – Dec. 5), a socio-political fable set against basketball and Tiananmen Square. Jennifer Chang directs.  Roundhousetheatre.org

At Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company, it’s Mike Lew’s “Teenage Dick” (Sept. 22 – Oct. 17), a modern, darkly comic, high school-set take on Shakespeare’s “Richard III.” Despite being bullied because of his cerebral palsy, Richard (Gregg Mozgala) is determined to be voted senior class president, and – like his ruthless Shakespearean namesake – he will do whatever it takes to win. Moritz von Stuelpnagel directs. Woollymammoth.net

At Olney Theatre Center (OTC) fall is “The Thanksgiving Play” (Sept. 29 – Oct. 31), Larissa FastHorse’s comedy about “white wokeness,” directed by Raymond O. Caldwell who is Black, Asian, and gay. The cast includes Parker Drown, Megan Graves, David Schlumpf, and Dani Stoller. 

OTC’s largest production of the year is “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast” (Nov. 5-Jan. 2, 2022). The tale is directed by Marcia Milgrom Dodge and stars out actor Jade Jones as Belle and Evan Ruggiero as the Beast. 

And the holiday tradition continues at OTC with Paul Morello’s solo show, “A Christmas Carol” (Nov. 26- Dec. 26). Over a swift and engaging two hours, Morello gives a faithful retelling of Charles Dickens’ original ghost story. Olneytheatre.org

Helen Hayes Award-winning actor Naomi Jacobson reprises the title role in Theater J’s production of Mark St. Germain’s “Becoming Dr. Ruth” (Sept. 30 – Oct. 24), a mostly cheery bio-drama about the diminutive, famously candid sex therapist. The solo show is again directed by out director/actor Holly Twyford. TheaterJ.org. 

Historic Ford’s Theatre is back with Deborah Brevoort’s “My Lord, What a Night” (October 1 – 24), an intriguing work based on the real-life friendship between famed African American contralto Marian Anderson (Felicia Curry) and Albert Einstein (Christopher Bloch). Fords.org

Synetic Theater is bringing its brand of suspenseful/sinister/sexy to Crystal City with “The Madness of Poe” (Oct. 11-31), a 90-mimute scary trilogy of Edgar Allen Poe works including a re-imagining of Synetic’s 2007 hit adaptation of “The Fall of the House of Usher” plus two more classic tales from the American master of mystery and macabre. The movement-based production is helmed by the celebrated duo, director Paata Tsikurishvili and choreographer Irina Tsikurishvili, and features a stellar nine-person cast including Ryan Sellars and out actors Alex Mills and Philip Fletcher. Synetictheater.org

The hotly anticipated national tour of Anaïs Mitchell’s “Hadestown” (Oct. 13-30) soon opens at the Kennedy Center Opera House. An enormous hit on Broadway (winner of eight 2019 Tony Awards), the musical “intertwines two mythic tales—that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone—as it invites you on a hell-raising journey to the underworld and back.” The cast includes out actor Levi Kreis as Hermes, the role for which out actor André De Shields won a Tony, and continues to play at the Walter Kerr Theatre in the reopened Broadway production.  

And in December, the Kennedy Center hosts the national tours of two hit juke box musicals: “Beautiful – The Carole King Musical” (Dec. 14-Jan. 2); and “Ain’t Too Proud,” (Dec. 15-Jan. 16), the story of Motown’s superstar R&B group, the Temptations. Kennedy-center.org

As part of its 25th anniversary season, Keegan Theatre presents the regional premiere of Adrienne Earle Pender’s “N” (Oct. 23-Nov. 20). The well-researched work is inspired by the success surrounding Eugene O’Neill’s breakthrough 1921 play, “The Emperor Jones,” that famously starred Charles S. Gilpin, the first African-American actor to carry a Broadway show. The hit play propelled both men to stardom; however, within five years O’Neill was world famous and Gilpin forgotten. According to Keegan’s website notes, “Pender’s ‘N’ explores the challenging relationship between Gilpin and O’Neill and how it ultimately hinged on one word — a word that lifted one of them to the heights of American theater and destroyed the other.” Keegantheatre.com

Constellation Theatre Company’s upcoming production is an alluringly titled original piece,“Mysticism & Music” (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21). Longtime collaborators Tom Teasley, A.J. Guban, and Constellation’s artistic director Allison Stockman are joined by Chao Tian in creating this new exploration ancient spiritual literature, poetry, and folklore from all over the world. Constellationtheatre.org

At Mosaic Theater Company, talented out director Serge Seiden stages playwright Anna Ouyang Moench’s “Birds of North America” (Oct. 27-Nov. 21). Over a dozen years, the strained relationship between father and daughter birders is eased while watching birds in the backyard of their suburban Maryland home. Mosaictheater.org 

Signature Theatre is reopening with “Rent” (Nov. 2-Jan. 2), Jonathan Larson’s iconic rock musical based loosely on Puccini’s 1896 opera “La bohème.” Set in New York’s East Village in the early 1990s, the Tony and Pulitzer-winning show tells the story of struggling artists dealing with love, life, gentrification, and AIDS. No other musical captures the place and era better. Signature’s recently named out artistic director Matthew Gardiner directs. Sigtheatre.org

Though the pop icon experience sometimes reads like Greek tragedy, this isn’t the usual classical fare. Shakespeare Theatre Company’s is premiering “Once Upon a One More Time” (Nov. 30-Jan. 2, 2022), a new Broadway-bound musical inspired by the music of Britney Spears (including “Oops!… I Did It Again,” “Lucky,” “Stronger,” and “Toxic”).  

Penned by out writer Jon Hartmere, the libretto turns the happily-ever-after princess fairytale on its ear – in the best way possible. Helming the show are married couple Keone and Mari Madrid, an award-winning choreographer/director team. Shakespearetheatre.org 

And beginning in early December, Studio Theatre presents “Flight” (Dec. 2-Feb. 20, 2022), an immersive installation created by Scottish innovators Vox Motus and designed by Jamie Harrison (“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” magic effects and illusions designer).

Described as “an invitation to bear witness to the personal stories of two of the 300,000 displaced children who make unaccompanied journeys every year,” “Flight” is the story of orphaned brothers who set off on an arduous journey across Europe in search of freedom and safety. 

There are no live actors in this production. Audience members experience the play from individual booths wearing headphones and viewing a handcrafted diorama in which the story unfolds in intimate miniature. Studiotheatre.org

Also, for December, Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington returns to Lincoln Theatre, the historic center of the U Street corridor, with “The Holiday Show” (Dec. 4, 11 & 12).  Along with the usual retinue of tap dancing elves and drag queens, the program includes favorite numbers from past holiday shows, and features performances from the full chorus, soloists, and GMCW ensembles (Potomac Fever, Rock Creek Singers, Seasons of Love and GenOUT Youth Chorus). Gmcw.org

There’s more holiday fare at National Theatre, including “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical” (Nov. 23-Dec.5). Also at National is the comedy musical “Tootsie,” Dec. 7-12. 

Continue Reading

Theater

Violin Channel’s digital concert series supports artists during COVID

Davies built world’s leading classical music news source

Published

on

Geoffrey John Davies founded the Violin Channel, theviolinchannel.com. (Photo by Lee Clifford)

Though classically trained on violin and viola, Geoffrey John Davies knew his destiny was never to perform. Instead, he went into communications with a specialization in advertising, and became the head of marketing for large insurance company. That wasn’t for him either. 

So, Davies left Australia for New York City in the summer of 2011, giving himself a year to find either a job in advertising or make a go of his promising brainchild, The Violin Channel (VC), a nascent violin and strings news and entertainment source.

In just three days, several big strings companies were buying advertising space on his website that had yet to be built. “Because they believed in my vision, I had the confidence to think I could do this,” says Davies, VC’s founder and CEO. 

What began as a social media hobby in Australia has grown into the world’s leading classical music news source with 17 employees and a combined reach of more than 1 million across social channels and newsletter subscribers. 

In February 2021, VC launched Vanguard Concerts, an original digital concert series featuring top strings players like Joshua Bell and Charles Yang. Co-produced by the Alphadyne Foundation, its mission is to support artists during COVID by giving them ownership of the material and making the programs available worldwide for free. In total, the series received 4.3 million views worldwide. 

For the second Vanguard Concerts (already filmed and slated to begin streaming in October), Davies encouraged musicians not to perform standard repertoire. “I asked them to play stuff they’re really passionate about. Also, we’ve included more interviews and interesting background information in the episodes. It’s fascinating for the seasoned listener and new audience member alike. We feel an obligation to make the music more accessible without dumbing down the experience.” 

The lineup includes rising star Stella Chen playing – among other pieces – Bartók’s “Sonata for Solo Violin,” composed when he was living in New York in the 1940s; Grammy-winning violinist Augustin Hadelich performing works by several Black composers he’s currently championing, and Paganini; and an hour with Spanish-born violinist Francisco Fullana, award-winning bandoneon player and composer JP Jofre, and superstar Spanish classical guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas. Other episodes will feature out superb violinists Alexi Kenney and Blake Pouliot.

“The series has been like a dream come true,” says Davies, who lives in New York’s West Village with his husband Richard Jordan, an architectural painter and designer, and their dog, Elgar. “Never in a million years did I think I’d have the opportunity to do something like this, to curate my ideas.” 

When he was new to the city, Davies celebrated Gay Pride Day on VC with a tribute to queer musicians and composers like Tchaikovsky and Saint-Saens. He received a mixed reaction that included hundreds of negative comments from outraged followers, including educators. 

“I was shocked. Something like that wouldn’t have been a big deal in Australia. It’s then that I realized I had a platform and refused to back down. We continue to celebrate pride annually.”

In a recent survey, 73% of the channel’s audience voiced support for VC’s support of social issues like LGBTQ equality, Black Lives Matter, and feminism. But even if the majority had disapproved, says Davies, he wouldn’t change a thing.

Increasingly, it’s become easier and easier for musicians to be out, he adds. “There’s a young violinist whom I adore. He makes his statement by wearing Alexander McQueen rainbow pants when he plays a Brahms solo.”

It’s “mind blowing” to Davies, 44, that 58% of their audience is under the age 35: “That’s a demographic unreachable by magazines. So, when people say classical music is aging out or dying, my response is ‘bullshit.’” 

More to celebrate: Davies received his permanent United States residency this year. 

“I’ve been under the radar for the last 12 years, but now that I have my green card, I see more opportunities in my future. I’m thinking a third Vanguard Concerts series, live concerts, and maybe programming two or three days of Vanguard Concerts within major European festivals. There’s a lot to look forward to.” 

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Us @washblade

Sign Up for Blade eBlasts

Popular