March 13, 2012 | by Phil Reese
Pa. delays discussion of anti-gay constitutional amendment bill

The Pennsylvania Legislature has put on hold discussion of a proposed bill that would bar in the state Constitution recognition of same-sex marriage, according to the blog PoliticsPA.com.

According to ThinkProgress, the move comes on the heels of outrage in the Keystone State over proposed legislation requiring voters to present identification before voting, as well as another proposed law to force women seeking abortions to view a state-produced video about pregnancy, and to be forced to undergo an ultrasound as well as be given personalized copies of the ultrasound at least 14 days before undergoing any procedure to terminate her pregnancy.

The proposed language amending the state Constitution to prevent recognition of same-sex couples is thought by many LGBT advocates as being far-reaching and extreme, mirroring language used in states like Michigan that outlawed not only recognition of marriage, but of civil unions, or the ability for agencies to offer domestic partnership benefits.

“Pennsylvania offers no legal protections in employment, housing, or public accommodations for the LGBT community,” LGBT researcher  for ThinkProgress, Zack Ford, told the Blade. “But today we can at least be glad that constitutionally enshrined discrimination is not on the agenda.”

Earlier this week, activists in Ohio, which has a similar constitutional amendment, were rejected in an attempt to apply to have an initiative added to the ballot repealing the law.

 

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