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Sipping out of summer

Sample regional wine, vegan creations and more at regional foodie events

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VegFest, gay news, Washington Blade

Vegan treats offered at D.C. VegFest. (Photo courtesy D.C. VegFest)

It’s astonishing how quickly summer seems to fade as August segues into September, but here we are, still stubbornly holding onto our glasses of chilled rosé and dreading the return of pumpkin spice latte.

Of course, the autumnal equinox is still weeks away and global warming is real, so there’s no reason to think that you can’t park your flip flops under at a curbside bistro somewhere and keep working on your tan, glass in hand. And, by the way, rosé is good year-round, so you can keep enjoying the pink as long as you feel like it.

With that in mind, here are a few ways to enjoy the last gasp of summer:

District Winery (385 Water St., S.E.; districtwinery.com): This shiny new space just opened on Aug. 30 in D.C.’s Navy Yard neighborhood with expansive views of the Anacostia River and a promise of District-made wine in the future. The much-anticipated commercial winery is the brainchild of Brian Leventhal and John Stires, founders of Brooklyn Winery, which opened in the New York borough’s Williamsburg neighborhood in 2010.

Recognizing that people love anything that has a local focus — as have D.C. entrepreneurs who slap the stars and bars on everything from beer cans to knee socks — Leventhal, Stires and winemaker Conor McCormack source grapes from across the country and around the world then process them in custom urban winemaking operations to create “local” wine.

VegFest D.C. (Yards Park, 355 Water St., S.E.; dcvegfest.com): You do not have to be vegan to enjoy this popular annual culinary event on Saturday, Sept. 2 from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. — you just have to be hungry. The free festival, now in its ninth year and the largest on the East Coast, showcases dozens of plant-based food vendors, from Everlasting Life’s authentic vegan soul food to Vegan Dots (yep, that’s non-dairy Dippin’ Dots), along with plenty of veggie burgers, hot dogs and samples of vegan cheese.

A large beer garden will be anchored by Busboys and Poets; the local restaurant chain already boasts an extremely veg-friendly menu but owner Andy Shallal recently hinted the restaurant is heading toward an entirely plant-based future. Be sure to bring a group of friends so everyone can take turns standing in line for the Vegan Treats Bakery tent — the Pennsylvania-made goodies are world-renowned, from the not-too-sweet Boston Cream doughnuts to owner Danielle Konya’s signature Chocolate Peanut Butter Mousse Bomb.

It could take two hours to get into the tent (yes, really), so load up on treats to take home and it will be worth every bite. Check out a cooking demonstration by Miyoko Schinner, founder of Miyoko’s Kitchen and author of “Artisan Vegan Cheese,” whose company makes some deceptively creamy nut-based cheese, and a rap performance by Grey, who took the internet by storm with his Vegan Thanksgiving freestyle video celebrating “cabbage and greens with no ham in it.”

VinoFest D.C. (1356 Okie St., N.E.; cityvinofest.com): More wine, you say? Here you go. As if it weren’t enough that District Winery just opened, City Winery — which already has locations in New York, Chicago, Nashville, Atlanta and Boston — is getting ready to open its doors in D.C.’s Ivy City neighborhood this winter. In the meantime, you can get a bit of a preview of their business model, which combines live music with housemade wines that are served on tap straight from the tank along with an extensive wine list from around the world.

VinoFest D.C. is Saturday, Sept. 9 from 2-10 p.m. and will feature more than 40 wine tastings, along with craft beverages from local distillers and brewers, including Atlas Brew Works, New Columbia Distillers, Republic Restoratives, and One Eight Distilling. There will be food from Ari’s Diner, ProFish, Ivy City Smokehouse, La Puerta Verde and Timber Pizza Co., and live performances include Chromeo, Allen Stone, Black Alley, and Aztec Sun. Tickets are $49 and up.

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Queer Wino’s William Ferguson on a mission to queer wine

Educational website elevates stories of LGBTQ figures in the industry

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William Ferguson elevates the stories of other LGBTQ people in the wine field.

William Ferguson likes talking about wine. His mission: queering wine. Ferguson, who uses he/they pronouns, runs Queer Wino, a wine sales and education website.

When Ferguson began in the industry, he stood in the face of discrimination for his sexuality and gender identity. In search of support and community, he set out to forge his own path of visibility and leadership for LGBTQ people in wine. He now holds a Level II certification from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET), but formal certifications and education were only the beginning.

With Queer Wino, his aim is simple: to raise awareness of the unique issues LGBTQ people face in the wine industry and to raise their profile. When buying wine, he endeavors to focus on smaller producers, unknown regions, and wines made by anyone outside of cis, straight, white men.

Ferguson’s work is neither pedantic nor esoteric. Breaking down barriers, he focuses on presenting the idea of wine – buying, tasting, pairing – approachable and enjoyable. His Instagram and TikTok feeds are full of thoughtful, candid posts about wine.

“The idea that only red wine can age is false, however, the whole story is complicated. Before I explain, let’s set the record straight — or gayly aligned — and acknowledge that there are age-worthy white wines, rosés, and sparkling wines,” reads one.

In another, Ferguson is strolling down a street in a simple white T-shirt. He posts an image with text that reads, “Red wine is more complex than white wine.” In the caption he states, “Ummmm. No. Just no. It’s not true. Both can be equally complex or simple.”

“Wine and food is a great way to create a space for people to connect,” he notes. “When people share food and wine it increases their feeling of connection and community. I just want this to be available to everyone, not just an elite few. So, I think what we can learn is that the magic of food and wine doesn’t have to be only one type of experience,” but an experience for all, he says.

Ferguson’s most impactful work began in 2020, when he launched a series titled, “Pride in Wine,” which highlights LGBTQ “wine nerds and professionals.” Pride in Wine is a series of profiles of queer people involved in the wine industry. Thus far, the series has profiled wine educators, vineyard managers, wine label owners, and more. The series is available on his website.

Wine is his profession, but also his passion. He looks for inspiration from people “who love it, and take it seriously, but still have a sense of humor about it.” As for other wine inspiration, he looks to the likes of writer Jancis Robinson and the activism of Justin Trabue, Darwin Acosta, and Elaine Chukan Brown. 

“There are countless situations where I just can’t tell if someone is taking me seriously or not because of how they may be perceiving me. Then there’s job-based discrimination. In a way, you can’t win. If you’re closeted on the job to protect yourself and seem to avoid things, people will think you’re lying, and if you’re out they may just not hire you or fire you or discriminate. I’ve even had an employer say there was just something about me at some point before firing me. It just makes you think and wonder.   

“A big part of visibility and representation is getting more people to see who you are authentically while doing what you love,” he says. Whether that’s debunking wine myths on Instagram or highlighting and elevating the stories of other LGBTQ people in the wine field, Ferguson is ensuring that there will always be space for queers in wine.

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An expansive vision leads D.C.’s Elcielo to a Michelin star

A conversation with Pedro Mendoza, Colombian restaurant’s ambassador

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D.C.’s Elcielo was awarded a coveted Michelin star earlier this year. (Photo by @Fleetstreetwriteup Rachel Paraoan)

Behind the 22 courses of Elcielo, the Michelin-starred, transportive Colombian restaurant that anchors the far end of La Cosecha in Northeast is a jack-of-all-trades translator. He is Pedro Mendoza, officially the Corporate Communications Officer of the Elcielo group, but more of a charismatic conductor, ensuring that the restaurant hits all the right notes coming from the composer – JuanMa Barrientos, owner and head chef, with a dozen-plus restaurants and bars and a hotel.

 Colombian-born Mendoza, a gay man, has worked with the Elcielo group since 2016 across its restaurants (Bogota, Medellin, Miami, and DC). He has been based in the D.C. outpost since its opening in 2021. While he works front of house many evenings at Elcielo, his day is filled with public relations and operational work for the other Elcielo spots and JuanMa’s many other restaurants. He also works in outreach for the Elcielo Foundation, a nonprofit that supports victims of Colombia’s civil war violence.

Mendoza has a long history in the culinary space. He has worked various events across Colombia, including the wine exposition Expovinos, the Bogotá Wine and Food Festival, and other performing arts, culture, and health fairs and festivals.

 Through his writings and work, Mendoza connected with Barrientos, who had by then established himself in the lofty Medellin food scene. He had founded Elcielo, a multi-sensory restaurant using modern, avant-garde techniques enmeshed with Colombian flavors and ingredients. Elcielo was what may have been the first fine-dining restaurant in Medellin, a tasting menu influenced by the country’s rich history but plated by JuanMa’s international vision. “It’s a fun luxury, not stuffy or rigid, it’s a fluid luxury,” says Mendoza. 

When he moved to Elcielo full time in 2016, Mendoza was focused on producing editorial content and promoting the brand. In 2019, he moved to D.C. to open this local project, acting as everything from designer to waiter to press officer. 

Mendoza also acts as ambassador of Colombia and Elcielo to D.C. and the world. “I am diplomatic and respectful, but also authentic and transparent,” he says. 

“As a gay man with 11 ethnic ancestors from four continents (my DNA test says so), I feel like a citizen of the world. My imprint is to do everything with passion and dedication.” 

Mendoza has seen plenty as an out Colombian who came of age during the terrors of its civil war. For that reason, working with the Foundation, which offers education and culinary training to wounded soldiers, ex-combatants, indigenous people, and other victims, is especially important.

“I love being a Colombian, succeeding in a market as demanding and cosmopolitan as D.C. is. Colombia is a special country whose inhabitants have suffered a lot from violence and the drug trade, which is a global problem, not just ours.” He is as proud of his Colombian heritage, of its bounty of fruits and vegetables and biodiversity, as he is of his personal life. “I was a flight attendant, I sang opera in a professional choir, I served in the army of my country. I don’t mind so much saying my sexual preference, because I think that belongs to people’s privacy; however, I don’t hide it, I show it with pride. If it is necessary to show myself as a 49-year-old gay man, I do.”

After just a year in business, Elcielo in D.C. was awarded with one Michelin star: the very first Colombian restaurant to attain this achievement. Earlier this year, the Elcielo outpost in Miami was also awarded one star, as part of the Michelin Guide’s first-ever selections for the Florida region. Michelin noted the expression of creativity and “serious culinary sorcery.” 

It’s JuanMa’s expansive vision, a reflection of Elcielo’ s name (meaning “sky” or “heaven” in Spanish), “so we try to ensure that everyone is treated with special care,” says Mendoza. This goes for the food, the customer, and the employee, Mendoza adds.

 “Elcielo is a very inclusive company,” says Mendoza. “I have had more diverse LGBTQ colleagues throughout the company: in administration, outreach, in the kitchen, and on the dining room floor, both in Colombia and in the U.S. I was able to start Elcielo DC from zero, and have now run communications and even visa logistics for other Colombian staff. This is an example of the company bringing opportunity to all types of people.” 

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Wharf celebrates fifth anniversary on Oct. 12

Live music, sidewalk sales, food, and drink on Southwest waterfront

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The Wharf in Southwest, home to Pride on the Pier in June, is celebrating its fifth anniversary this month. (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Five years in, the sweeping Wharf is only growing. On Oct. 12, the city’s glittering renewal project that established the Southwest neighborhood as a waterfront destination, is celebrating a two-fold event: its fifth anniversary and the substantial near-completion of the entire development. With Phase 1 built out and Phase 2 tantalizingly close, this mile-long stretch along the Potomac River has come to life with restaurants, retailers, residences, hotels, shops, and businesses, surrounded by monumental views and a vibrant culture.

The celebration on Oct. 12 runs from 5-8 p.m., with activities, live music, sidewalk sales, outdoor vendors, and food and drink specials along the entire strip. Jarreau Williams will take the stage for live music on the Transit Pier floating stage, followed by The JoGo Project at 6:45 p.m. The event concludes with a fireworks finale just before 8 p.m. Meanwhile, an indoor ceremony kicks off at the new Pendry Hotel at 5:30 p.m., featuring remarks by Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton and Mayor Muriel Bowser.

The Killers headline at The Anthem at 8 p.m. for that venue’s fifth anniversary show.

Phase 1 of The Wharf opened in 2017, with more than two million square feet of residences, offices, hotels, shops, restaurants, and a marina. It also featured intentional public areas, including parks, promenades, piers, and docks. Phase 1 also saw the establishment of a new water taxi system, the Southwest Neighborhood Shuttle, and a new bike lane. Some of the city’s most popular restaurants kicked off during Phase 1, like Del Mar, Grazie Grazie, ilili, Kaliwa, and Mi Vida.

Phase 2 will include a robust roster of chef-driven restaurant concepts, and 1.25 million square feet of development, including offices, hotels, restaurants, and shopping, in its own section of redeveloped waterfront. It will also include 225 boat slips and a 1.5-acre green space. New restaurants planned include:

• Flora Flora (655 Water St., S.W., 2nd Floor): Latin-influenced poolside restaurant combining the cuisines of Mexico, Peru, and Argentina.

• Gordon Ramsay Fish & Chips (665 Wharf St., S.W.): Michelin-starred chef Gordon Ramsay’s British-themed counter offering elevated fish & chips.

• Gordon Ramsay Hell’s Kitchen (652 Wharf St. SW): Ramsay’s surf-and-turf restaurant, which pays tribute to his hit “Hell’s Kitchen” TV show, with steak and seafood offerings, including its famous Beef Wellington and lobster risotto. Located in a two-story building directly on the water.

• Kinfolk Southern Kitchen (685 Wharf St., S.W.): Americana bourbon and barbecue restaurant featuring spirits and smoky flavors.

• Philippe by Philippe Chow (635 Wharf St.): Iconic New York City restaurant for almost two decades. Philippe Chow has become a staple with a world-renowned menu of Beijing-style dishes that has pioneered the way for elevated Chinese cuisine in the U.S.

• Slice of Match Box (664 Maine Ave SW): Wood-fired pizza eatery taking the best of regional brand Matchbox in a fast-casual setting with table service and a full bar.

At full build-out, the mixed-use neighborhood will feature more than 3.2 million square feet of development along a mile of Washington, stretching from the Municipal Fish Market at the north end to Fort McNair in the south. In total, the Wharf will have 300,000 square feet of retail space, featuring more than 85 restaurants and retail shops. And beyond the boats, there is also a free kayak and paddleboard launch.

This event kicks off The Wharf’s “Season of Celebration,” featuring nine months of community events and experiences commemorating the completion of The Wharf. This includes everything to a Dia de Los Muertos celebration, a holiday boat parade, Mardi Gras, and, of course, Pride on the Pier in June.

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