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Top sport sedans

Driving fast cars in a slow economy

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Luxury sedans in this economy? Yes, like Lady Gaga, you actually can mix flashy and frugal.

Still, in today’s slow job market, luxo sport sedans connote success and can set you apart from the competition. And after years of lackluster quality, today’s luxury cars are built better than ever.

Then there’s depreciation. Higher-end vehicles usually hold their value better than less expensive rides. So even if you can’t afford new, a used luxury sedan—especially if it’s still under warranty—can be a prudent buy.

At the end of the day, it’s really like choosing Pradas over Penny loafers: going upscale looks better, lasts longer and may save you money in the long run.

BMW 5 Series
$45,000
Mpg: 20 city/29 highway

As if BMW didn’t offer enough testosterone with its high-performance M cars, now comes the sixth-gen 5 Series. All three trim levels get gutsier engines, with the top-end 550i blasting from 0 to 60 mph in a blistering 5 seconds. Even the low-end 528i—at $15,000 less—can hit 0 to 60 in just 6.6 seconds. Despite more power, fuel economy is also up. Styling is more buttoned down—call it understated elegance—with softer lines and a front-end that no longer mimics the Batmobile. And ride and handling are BMW at its best, with tight braking and cornering. As with most of the cars below, the 5 Series comes with traction/stability control, as well as pre-collision, lane-departure and blind-spot warning systems. And BMW lovers will be happy to learn that the iDrive audio/climate/info control is less geeky and much simpler now. Two must-have options: 14-way power front seats and an automatic parallel-parking system.

Infiniti M37
$47,000
Mpg: 18 city/26 highway

Sleek, sinewy and sensual. No, it’s not those shirtless World Cup athletes. But the redesigned M37 also sizzles, with a longer, wider and lower profile that makes it more macho. The cabin is also slick, with flowing lines, bolstered seats and a bubble dash. A strapping 330-hp V6 is the best in its class, giving Euro competitors a run for their money. Those same competitors quickly tack on expensive options, but the M offers plenty of standard gear: bi-xenon headlights, power-folding heated mirrors, dual-zone automatic climate control, rearview camera, Bluetooth and iPod interface. Upscale packages add an air-purifier, power sunshade and “eco” pedal that makes it easier for the driver to save gas—though it often feels like Thing from the Addams Family pushing back on your foot as you try to accelerate. For $10,000 more, there’s the M56, with its brawny 420-hp V8 and throbbing exhaust rumble.

Mercedes E-Class
$48,000
Mpg: 18 city/26 highway

Long the standard bearer for premium luxe sedans, Mercedes suffered quality-control issues the past decade. But no longer, as evidenced by the recently restyled E-Class with its stellar fit and finish. Two engine choices-—the V6 and V8—are carryovers, but that’s OK. Both are potent and gas-savvy. Everything else is new, with firm yet comfortable seats, lots of legroom and spot-on braking and handling. Best of all, the new E costs $5,500 less than last-year’s model. Few automakers can streamline costs like that, yet at the same time bolster quality. Along with the usual high-end gizmos, the midsize E also has infrared night-vision display, power trunk-lid closer, panoramic sunroof and—in what feels like pure nirvana—a massage function built into the driver’s seat.

Porsche Panamera
$76,000
Mpg: 18 city/27 highway

In 2003, Porsche—after 70 years of making exotic two-seaters—stunned auto aficionados with its Cayenne SUV family hauler. In 2010, Porsche turned heads again by churning out its first sedan: the V8-powered Panamera hatchback. This year, two lower-priced V6 models are added to the Panamera lineup. The result—regardless of engine choice—is the sexiest, most thrilling sedan on dealer lots today. Panameras offer the best of the 911 coupes—superb control, rousing speed—along with roomy cabins and every amenity conceivable. There’s even a backseat refrigerator and whopping 16-speaker stereo. And with the backseats folded, the cargo space expands to an impressive 44.6 cubic feet.

Purists may scoff at Panameras, just like they did with Cayennes, which have become one of Porsche’s best sellers.

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Autos

Rugged yet ritzy: Ford Bronco, Nissan Pathfinder

One offers retro design, the other an edgy and chic look

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Ford Bronco

Both the Ford Bronco and Nissan Pathfinder have rough-and-ready reputations. Each boasts butch bona fides and some nifty off-road capability. But dig a bit deeper into your wallet, and you can step up to higher trim levels for added power and a bit more bling. 

FORD BRONCO HERITAGE LIMITED EDITION

$70,000 

MPG: 17 city/17 highway

0 to 60 mph: 6.2 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 77.6 cu. ft. 

PROS: Retro design, rousing engine rumble, myriad amenities

CONS: Low fuel economy, bouncy ride, pricey

IN A NUTSHELL: After a 24-year hiatus, the Ford Bronco came galloping back to showrooms in 2021. Today there are nine trim levels, including the Heritage Limited Edition that I just finished test driving for a week. At $70,000, this Bronco—second only to the $90,000 Raptor—still costs a pretty penny: $30,000 more than the entry-level model. Yet the higher price is worth it, with a gritty V6 turbo that offers much more giddy-up than the standard four-cylinder engine. 

There’s also a rad retro design, with heritage-style graphics, multiple skid plates, and special bumpers and fenders. Exterior colors—especially the Robin’s Egg Blue, coupled with a white grille and white roof—are a nice throwback to the 1960s. So are the removable doors and roof panels for a safari-like look à la an old-timey “Wild Kingdom” episode. 

Yes, the Bronco is a truck-based SUV, so expect more bounciness than in a Lexus or a Lincoln. But the stable steering and comfortable seats help make up for it. Ground clearance is high, thanks to large 35-inch mud-terrain tires. Luckily, running boards and numerous rubber-lined grab handles make it easy to climb in and out. 

Despite the sound-deadening insulation, there’s still a fair amount of exterior wind noise at high speeds. But this makes it easier to hear the sweet sound of the Bronco’s strong whinny, er, exhaust growl. 

Along with a vibe that’s decidedly old-school cool, this mid-sizer comes with lots of modern amenities: keyless entry, remote start, heated seats, ambient lighting, dual-zone automatic climate control, 360-degree surround-view camera and 10-speaker premium B&O stereo. New this year is a larger, 12-inch touchscreen. I also liked the huge stowage area, with convenient cargo straps to hold down gear, a flip-up rear window for easy access, and a swing-out door to hold a full-size spare tire. 

I guess you could say Ford wasn’t horsing around when it decided to add such a fully loaded Bronco to the stable. 

NISSAN PATHFINDER ROCK CREEK

$44,000

MPG: 20 city/23 highway

0 to 60 mph: 7.0 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 80.4 cu. ft. 

PROS: Roomy, comfy, muted cabin

CONS: So-so gas mileage, tight third row, many competitors 

IN A NUTSHELL: Seeking an SUV that’s more diamonds than denim? Then consider the Nissan Pathfinder, also redesigned just a few years ago and a big step up from the previous model. But instead of retro styling like a Ford Bronco, the look here is a combo of edgy and chic. 

That’s especially true with the Rock Creek version, which sports an aggressive front fascia, grille inserts, trendy black cladding, raised off-road suspension, all-terrain tires and tubular roof rack that can hold 220 pounds. “Rock Creek” badging, which is stamped on the side panels and rear liftgate, is also embroidered in stylish orange contrast stitching on the water-resistant seats. All-wheel drive — optional on all other trims — is standard here. And Rock Creek towing capacity, which is 3,500 pounds on most other Pathfinders, is an impressive 6,000 pounds.

The spacious cabin has enough room for up to eight passengers, though third-row legroom is tight. In the second row, you can opt for a pair of captain’s chairs instead of a three-person bench seat. Regardless, those rear seats are heated, which is a nice touch. 

Nissan has done a good job of making vehicles that feel as rich and luxurious as those in its high-end Infiniti lineup. On the Pathfinder, that means thicker glass and extra insulation for a whisper-quiet cabin. There’s also brushed-aluminum trim and a sporty flat-bottom steering wheel with paddle shifters. Along with smartphone integration, wireless charging pad and voice-command capability, other tech features include a windshield head-up display, 360-degree bird’s-eye camera, ambient interior lighting, 13-speaker Bose stereo and a slew of safety options. 

Nissan Pathfinder

When comparing the Ford Bronco with the Nissan Pathfinder, it’s hard to resist the rip-roaring ride of a fun and feisty Bronco. But the more practical Pathfinder is still plenty adventurous, especially with all the goodies that come in the Rock Creek.

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Autos

Retro rides: Dodge Hornet PHEV, VW ID.Buzz Microbus

Everything old is new again

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Dodge Hornet PHEV

A new year means new vehicles sashaying into dealer showrooms. But for 2024, retro is in, with nostalgic nameplates like the Dodge Hornet and VW Bus proving everything old is new again. Between you and me, though, let’s leave the Cadillac Cimarron, Ford Edsel and anything remotely resembling a Yugo as footnotes to history. 

DODGE HORNET PHEV

$41,000

Electric-only range: 33 miles

MPG: 74 MPGe (electric/gas), 29 MPG (gas only)

0 to 60 mph: 5.6 seconds

Cargo room: 54.7 cu. ft. with rear seats down

PROS: Stylish, comfy, peppy

CONS: Snug, bit bouncy, pricey

IN A NUTSHELL: According to automotive lore, the first Hornet (1905-1906) was a short-lived, two-seat runabout from Horner & Sons. Then came the British-built Wolseley Hornet (1930-1936, and again 1960-1961). Next up, the Hudson Hornet (1951-1957), available as family sedan, coupe or convertible. The performance-oriented coupe—nicknamed “Fabulous Hudson Hornet”—would rule the world of stock-car racing and establish the Hornet’s daredevil image. AMC created its own Hornet (1970-1977), but this time for a blah compact car—a sibling to the butt-ugly Gremlin. To be fair, one of the best movie stunts ever is James Bond performing a corkscrew car jump over a Bangkok river while driving an AMC Hornet. 

Now, after a decades-long hiatus, Dodge has resurrected the Hornet name for its all-new subcompact SUV. While this latest Hornet debuted as a 2023 model with a gas engine, the buzz this year is the addition of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)—the first ever from Dodge.

The Hornet PHEV comes in two versions: R/T and R/T Plus. Both pack plenty of punch, with twice the horsepower of many competitors. Use the paddle shifters to activate the PowerShot system, which adds an extra 30 horses for even more oomph. Alas, this feature—which allows the Hornet to boast muscle-car acceleration—lasts only about 15 seconds before the system needs to cool down for another 15 seconds. 

But no matter the speed, the standard all-wheel drive and premium Brembo brakes keep everything under control. One handling complaint: Because of the short wheelbase, there is some annoying bobbing up and down over large potholes. 

Built on the same platform as a tony Alfa Romeo Tonale, the Hornet shares similar design cues, including chiseled side panels, narrow LED headlights and high roofline. But only the Hornet has two sleek, functional hood scoops. 

Inside, the Alfa ambience continues with a nicely sculpted dash, flat-bottom steering wheel and scooped-out center console. Even the door handles and infotainment system look the same in both vehicles. 

As with all hornets, beware the sting. In this case, it’s pricing: A fully loaded Hornet R/T Plus can easily approach $55,000. 

VOLKSWAGEN ID.BUZZ MICROBUS

$55,000 (est.)

Range: 260 miles

Fast-charge time: Up to 80% in 30 minutes 

0 to 60 mph: 7.5 seconds

Cargo room: 138 cu. ft.

PROS: Fun colors, fun styling, fun ride 

CONS: Limited appeal, limited production, limited trim level 

IN A NUTSHELL: Legend has it that a Dutch businessman sketched the VW van after visiting a Volkswagen plant in 1947. Two years later a prototype was built, and the first Microbus rolled off the production line in 1950. 

Production ceased in 2014, but only after countless variations were built—many with beds, sinks, tents, picnic furniture, surfboard racks and the like. This proud symbol of the counterculture hippie movement of the 1960s likely has been in more movies, TV shows, and magazine ads than there have been Grateful Dead concerts (2,300-plus so far, for all you Jerry Garcia fans). 

While technically a 2025 model, the all-electric VW ID.Buzz arrives later this year. The chassis is from the ID.4 electric crossover, but everything else is new. Groovy colors include Cabana Blue, Mahi Green, Pomelo Yellow, Energetic Orange and more. 

The space-age cabin has an “Orville” vibe, with a large 12.9-inch touchscreen hovering over the dash, 30-color ambient lighting and an expansive windshield. The accelerator even has an audio/video “Play” symbol engraved on the pedal, while the brake pedal is engraved with the “Pause” symbol. Too cute? Well, maybe… 

Two trim levels, but only the long-wheelbase model will be sold in the U.S. That means three rows of seats, with optional captain’s chairs in the second row. The front seats even come with a massage function. Oh, and the optional panoramic sunroof with electrochromic tint can change from opaque to clear with the swipe of your finger. Shagadelic, baby!

While the Dodge Hornet R/T can trace its lineage to at least one fast and fabulous forebear, fans of this new VW can thank generations of Deadheads for spreading the love about the original bus. But crank up the sublime 14-speaker Harman Kardon stereo, and this new VW suddenly channels another far-out ride: “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.”

VW ID.Buzz Microbus
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Car crazy: Nissan Altima, Suburu Impreza

Gas-to-electric timing isn’t happening as quickly as we expected

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Nissan Altima

Cars are out. Sport-utes are in. And electric vehicles will replace internal-combustion vehicles tomorrow. Eh, not so fast.

Doing everything possible to lower emissions and save the planet is a good thing, of course. But the gas-to-electric timing isn’t happening as quickly as many of us expected — or hoped. EV sales have stalled for various reasons: expensive sticker prices, higher interest rates, lingering range anxiety and a limited charging network. It will take time for those issues to shake out. 

As for the car-versus-SUV debate, some drivers like me still like being able to opt for a sedan or hatchback. That’s especially true when a traditional car checks all the boxes: style, comfort, handling, eco-friendly and affordable. Luckily, both cars here do just that. 

NISSAN ALTIMA

$27,000

MPG: 27 city/40 highway

0 to 60 mph: 8.0 seconds

Cargo room: 15.4 cu. ft.

PROS: low price, high safety score, enjoyable to drive

CONS: tepid acceleration, some cheap plastics, limited production

IN A NUTSHELL: Looking at the Nissan sedan lineup, you can say sayonara to the full-sized Maxima. (Well, at least the gas-powered version. This flagship nameplate is returning in 2025 as a much-anticipated EV.)

Ditto the itty-bitty Versa, which will be discontinued in two years. 

As for the compact Sentra, its future is secure (at least for now) thanks to robust sales.  

Then there’s the midsize Altima, which is set to follow the same fate as the Maxima and Versa, despite having similarly strong sales as the Sentra.

But wait! After a week testing the Altima, I found plenty of reasons to buy one before they’re gone. 

This sedan is large enough to carry up to five passengers and scads of cargo, but small enough to park almost anywhere. There’s also affordability: Only 8% of new vehicles are less than $30,000. And at $26,000, the base-model Altima is about half the average price of a new car—which is a whopping $48,000. 

As for gas mileage, the Altima averages 40 mpg on the highway, which ain’t shabby. Same with the many standard features: keyless entry, push-button ignition, three USB ports, satellite radio and more. Notable options include heated steering wheel, 12.3-inch touchscreen, nine-speaker Bose stereo and heated side mirrors with turn-signal indicators. One minor glitch: Nissan offers one of the best 360-degree birds-eye backup cameras, but the resolution here could be crisper. 

Overall, it’s hard to ignore such responsive steering and solid build quality, along with the quiet cabin and high reliability ratings. Oh, and expect Altima pricing to get even lower as the eventual end date nears.

SUBARU IMPREZA

Subaru Impreza

$25,000

MPG: 27 city/34 highway

0 to 60 mph: 7.8 seconds

Cargo room: 20.4 cu. ft.

PROS: updated this year, full of features, surprisingly roomy

CONS: low ground clearance, bit noisy inside, no more sedan 

IN A NUTSHELL: To better compete against the onslaught of SUVs and pickups, the Subaru Impreza has been redesigned this year. Gone is the sedan, but what remains is one hot hatchback. With a wider grille, bolder wheel arches and stiffer chassis, there’s now an edgy tuner-car vibe. 

Fold down the back seats and — voila! — the stowage capacity more than doubles to 56 cubic feet. Plenty of storage in the console and door pockets, as well. Each of the center-console cupholders can hold 32-ounce containers, so fewer stops at Starbucks. And even the rear cargo area has water-bottle holders—a bonus during roadside stops or tailgating events. 

Those dual 7-inch displays in the base model are fine but, well, a bit meh. Better to opt for the enhanced 11.6-inch vertical touchscreen, like those found in higher-end vehicles from Lexus and Volvo. 

I test drove the performance-oriented RS trim level, which boasts more power, spiffy wheels, paddle shifters, wireless smartphone charging pad, and heated wipers and side mirrors. Options include sunroof, power driver’s seat and 10-speaker Harmon Kardon sound system. 

The list of safety gear is equally fine, with adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitor with rear cross-traffic alert, forward collision warning with automatic braking, evasive-steering assist and more. My favorite: adaptive LED headlights that swivel when turning the steering wheel to give better illumination in curves. Those LEDs also perform a razzle-dazzle light show when first turned on. 

One quibble: interior road noise, which is a bit more than expected. But then, hey, you get to enjoy more of that sexy engine growl.

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