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Cardi B explains ‘Girls’ collaboration, apologizes to LGBT community

The rapper is featured on the controversial track

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Cardi B (Screenshot via YouTube)

Cardi B explained her collaboration on the controversial song “Girls” and apologized to the LGBT community in a series of tweets on Tuesday.

“Girls,” which also features Rita Ora, Bebe Rexha and Charli XCX, has come under fire for exploiting the LGBT community. Lesbian pop singer Hayley Kiyoko released a statement calling the song “tone deaf” which “does more harm than good for the LGBTQ+ community.”

R&B singer Kehlani, who identifies as queer, echoed Kiyoko’s sentiments tweeting “hate to be THAT guy but there were many awkward slurs, quotes, and moments that were like ‘word? word.’”

On the track Cardi B raps, “Now I could be your lipstick just for one night (one night) / Girls just wanna have fun, they have their funds right (yeah) / I mean, say my name, say my name, say my name (say my name). It tastes good just running up your tongue, right? (hurrr) / I put this smack on your lips all so pucker up (mwah) / We ain’t never heard of you ’cause you ain’t gun enough / And I don’t gotta introduce myself (Cardi) / I’m too sexy, I seduce myself (Bardi) / Seven figure, never need a n—a (nope) / I steal your chick, have her down with the scissor / Tonight, I don’t want a dog, I want a kitten / I might french your girls and break bread.”

The 25-year-old rapper has now revealed she’s had sexual experiences with “a lot of women” and could relate to the song.

“Listen to “GIRLS” by Rita Ora ft me @BebeRexha @charli_xcx .We never try to cause harm or had bad intentions with the song .I personally myself had experiences with other woman ,shiieeett with a lot of woman ! I though the song was a good song and i remember my experience,” Cardi B tweeted.

Cardi B also apologized to the LGBT community for using offensive slurs. In a resurfaced interview, Cardi B refers to women she has dated as “dykes” and says although she enjoys having sex with women she could never be in a relationship with one.

When the video began circulating the internet Cardi B tweeted, “WTF how am I suppose to know how to call them when in New York that’s how we call it. I’m bisexual my self and I been involved with woman and my sister is a lesbian. You motherf–kers try to find a problem with everything. If I’m going to apologize for something is for not knowing what are the right terms to call people. You guys want me to be something that I’m not I’m not going to let you make me feel like I’m something that I’m not. Ya so quick to bash but not educate.”

The tweets have since been deleted.

Cardi B made another apology saying she wasn’t educated on LGBT slurs.

“I know i have use words before that i wasn’t aware that they are offensive to the LGBT community. I apologize for that. Not everybody knows the correct “terms “to use.I learned and i stopped using it,” Cardi B writes.

One fan responded tweeting, “I went through this myself. I grew up in a small city where people always said “dike” so I thought it was an okay thing to say but when I moved away I quickly learned it was offensive. We all learn and grow boo that’s life.”

Cardi B responded that she had a similar experience tweeting, “Exactly me too .My own friends be like  ‘I’m a dyke so i never thought it was a offensive word .I was like wtf.'”

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Books

New book explores ‘Breaking the Rainbow Ceiling’

The benefits of coming out at work

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(Book cover image courtesy of Bloomsbury)

‘Breaking the Rainbow Ceiling’
By Layla McCay
c.2024, Bloomsbury
$24/240 pages

You can see the CEO’s office from the outside of your workplace.

You’ve actually been in that office, so you know what it looks like inside, too. Big, expansive desk. Cushy, expensive chair. Ankle-deep carpet. The CEO got there through regular means over the course of his career – something you’d like to do, too. But as you know, and as in the new book, “Breaking the Rainbow Ceiling” by Layla McCay, you’ll have to take a different path.

Of all the thousands of board seats and C-suite occupiers in American businesses, only a very tiny number – less than one percent – are occupied by people who identify as LGBTQ. In London, says McCay, no one on the Financial Times Stock Exchange identifies as such. Just six of the world’s leaders, past or current, have come out as LGBTQ.

The reasons for this are many, from discomfort to a sense of a lack of safety or just plain mistrust. Employees often don’t talk about it and employers can’t or don’t ask, which can lead to a lot of issues that cis, heterosexual employees don’t have to think about.

LGBTQ employees make less money than their straight co-workers. They experience discrimination ranging from sexual violence on one end, to micro aggressions on the other. Discrimination can be found in educational settings, and networking events, in a lack of mentorship, and the feeling that one needs to “code-switch.” Even an overseas job offer can be complicated by identifying as LGBTQ.

And yet, says McCoy, there are benefits to coming out, including a sense of authenticity, and feeling as if a load has been removed from one’s shoulders.

If you are an employer, McCoy says, there are things you can do to help. Include LGBTQ people in your diversity programs at work. Insist on it for recruitment. Make sure your employees feel safe to be themselves. Make all policies inclusive, all the time, from the start. Doing so benefits your business. It helps your employees.

“It’s good for society.”

Pretty common sense stuff, no? Yeah, it is; most of what you’ll read inside “Breaking the Rainbow Ceiling” is, in fact, very commonsensical. Moreover, if you’re gay, lesbian, bi, trans, or queer, you won’t find one new or radical thing in this book.

And yet, inside all the nothing-new, readers will generally find things they’ll appreciate. The statistics, for instance, that author Layla McCay offers would be helpful to cite when asking for a raise. It’s beneficial, for instance, to be reminded why you may want to come out at work or not. The advice on being and finding a mentor is gold. These things are presented through interviews from business leaders around the world, and readers will find comfort and wisdom in that. You’ll just have to wade through a lot of things you already know to get it, that’s all.

Is it worth it? That depends on your situation. You may find nothing in “Breaking the Rainbow Ceiling,” or it may help you raise the roof.

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Out & About

Under Armour hosts LGBTQ obstacle course

‘Unmatched Pride’ event held in Baltimore

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Unmatched Athlete in partnership with Under Armour Unified will host the inaugural “Unmatched Pride event for LGBTQ+ and allied youths” on Saturday, July 20 at 11 a.m. at the Stadium at 2601 Port Covington Dr. in Baltimore Peninsula.

Teens 13-17 and kids 8-12 will have the ability to compete in obstacle course activity and skills challenges. The obstacle course will consist of a variety of fun stations that will test participants in strength, agility, and cardio. Flag football skill challenges and more will be offered.

For those who are interested, there will be an opportunity for youths to compete with and/or against their parents as well at 1:30 p.m. Registration is available on Eventbrite

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Out & About

Blade’s Peter Rosenstein holds book talk in Rehoboth

‘Born This Gay’ memoir explored

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Longtime Washington Blade contributor Peter Rosenstein will hold an author talk on Thursday, July 25 at 5:30 p.m. at CAMP Rehoboth (37 Baltimore Ave., Rehoboth Beach, Del.) in conversation with fellow author Fay Jacobs. The pair will discuss Rosenstein’s new memoir, “Born This Gay: My Life of Activism, Politics, Travel, and Coming Out.” Register at camprehoboth.org.

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