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Federal Triangles to host IGLFA 2022 World Championships

D.C. event slated for June 7-12

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The Federal Triangles Soccer Club en route to winning the IGLFA 2016 Outdoor World Championships in Portland. (Photo by Glen Auve)

The Federal Triangles Soccer Club will host the International Gay & Lesbian Football Association (IGLFA) 2022 Outdoor World Championships from June 7-12 in Washington, D.C. It has been 13 years since the club previously hosted the event.

The discussion to host began for the Federal Triangles when they were competing at the 2018 Paris Gay Games with the initial intent to bid on the 2021 IGLFA tournament. The pandemic ended those plans as international tournaments were canceled through 2021.

The 2022 tournament was expected to be held in conjunction with the 2022 Hong Kong Gay Games, but the IGLFA pulled out two months before the Hong Kong postponement was announced due to lack of feedback on the playing fields. 

“We restarted the bid committee and put everything back together with the same framework,” says Craig Williams, tournament chair. “The only change was re-envisioning the event for a post-pandemic world.”

The IGLFA selected D.C. for a 7v7 championship and Sydney was awarded an 11v11 championship to be held in February of 2023.

In an effort to drum up support for the event, bid committee members traveled to local soccer tournaments across the country and the Federal Triangles also competed at the IGLFA 2022 Indoor World Championships in Las Vegas this past January.

“We listened to what players were saying and shortened the tournament to four days,” Williams says. “We also adopted a 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. playing schedule, which will allow players to complete any remote work tasks before heading to the fields.”

The venue for bracket play is The Fields at RFK Campus and there will be D1, D2, D3, and Master’s (over-40) divisions for both all-gender and women’s teams. More than 300 players are expected to compete in the event.

The championship matches for all divisions will be held at Garrison Elementary School on June 11 from 1-6 p.m., just one block off the Capital Pride parade route.

Players from the tournament will be attending social events at locations around the District from June 7-12 and non-players are welcome to purchase guest passes for all of the events. There will be a beer garden onsite for fans during the bracket play at the RFK fields. 

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the IGLFA, there will be a diversity and inclusion panel at Pitchers/ALOHO on June 9.

“We hope that the atmosphere we are creating encourages anyone in the community to come out and watch some soccer,” says Williams. “All of the Federal Triangles are looking forward to welcoming old friends and new friends, great soccer matches, and celebrating Pride.”

Information for volunteers, fans and non-players can be found on the tournament website.

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Politics

Caitlyn Jenner celebrates FINA ban on Trans swimmers on Twitter

“[…] what’s fair is fair! If you go through male puberty you should not be able to take medals away from females. Period,” Jenner tweeted

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Screenshot/YouTube Fox News

Former Olympian and one-time California Republican gubernatorial candidate Caitlyn Jenner enraged Trans activists Monday after she tweeted her approval of the FINA vote Sunday that essentially bans Trans women from participating and competing as collegiate swimmers.

“It worked! I took a lot of heat – but what’s fair is fair! If you go through male puberty you should not be able to take medals away from females. Period,” Jenner tweeted Sunday after the international athletic organization announced its vote to ban trans athletes.

The Swimming’s world governing body voted to restrict transgender athletes from elite women’s competitions. The final vote tally of the representatives was 71.5% approval for the new policy which requires transgender athletes show that “they have not experienced any part of male puberty beyond Tanner Stage 2 or before age 12, whichever is later.”

“We have to protect the rights of our athletes to compete, but we also have to protect competitive fairness at our events, especially the women’s category at FINA competitions,” FINA’s president, Husain Al-Musallam, said in a statement.

The organisation is maintaining that it was necessary to use sex and sex-linked traits to determine eligibility criteria because of the “performance gap” that appears between males and females during puberty.

Jenner’s appearances on the Fox News Network over the past six months have been unrelenting attacks on Trans athletes, especially University of Pennsylvania Women’s Team swimmer Lia Thomas. Jenner also appeared on the network to defend her attacks on Trans athletes.

“We must protect women’s sports. We cannot bow down to the radical left wing woke world and the radical politically charged agenda of identity politics,” Jenner tweeted. In another tweet she said;

“Thank you @seanhannity and @HeyTammyBruce for having a conversation grounded in common sense. All we want to do is protect women’s and girls sports! It’s that simple. And calling out the libelous, defamatory lies of @PinkNews and @emilychudy@benjamincohen

Jenner has been asked about her position on the multiple pieces of anti-Trans youth sports legislation across the United States. She responded that she saw it as a question of fairness saying that she opposed biological boys who are Trans- competing in girls’ sports in school.

“It just isn’t fair,” Jenner said adding, “and we have to protect girls’ sports in our school.”

In April the Fox network hired Jenner as on-air contributor role with her first appearance on Hannity.

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Sports

World swimming body FINA votes to ban Trans athletes

Says policy necessary because of ‘biological performance gap’

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FINA's president, Husain Al-Musallam, announcing the new policy Sunday in Budapest (Screenshot/YouTube 10 News First)

The Swimming’s world governing body FINA meeting in the Hungarian capital city voted to restrict transgender athletes from elite women’s competitions. The final vote tally of the representatives was 71.5% approval for the new policy which requires transgender athletes show that “they have not experienced any part of male puberty beyond Tanner Stage 2 or before age 12, whichever is later.”

Enactment of that requirement effectively eliminates trans women’s eligibility to compete in the women’s category.

Tanner Stages describe the physical changes people undergo during puberty.

“We have to protect the rights of our athletes to compete, but we also have to protect competitive fairness at our events, especially the women’s category at FINA competitions,” FINA’s president, Husain Al-Musallam, said in a statement.

The organisation is maintaining that it was necessary to use sex and sex-linked traits to determine eligibility criteria because of the “performance gap” that appears between males and females during puberty.

“Without eligibility standards based on biological sex or sex-linked traits, we are very unlikely to see biological females in finals, on podiums, or in championship positions; and in sports and events involving collisions and projectiles, biological female athletes would be at greater risk of injury,” the statement from FINA’s new policy read.

Athlete Ally, which advocates for Trans athletes responded:

“FINA’s new eligibility criteria for transgender athletes and athletes with intersex variations is deeply discriminatory, harmful, unscientific and not in line with the 2021 International Olympic Committee framework on Fairness, Inclusion and Non-Discrimination on the Basis of Gender Identity and Sex Variations,” said Anne Lieberman, Director of Policy and Programs at Athlete Ally.

“This sudden and discriminatory decision is a blatant attack on transgender athletes who have worked to comply with longstanding policies that have allowed them to participate for years without issue,” said Joni Madison, Human Rights Campaign Interim President. “This policy is an example of swimming organizations caving to the avalanche of ill-informed, prejudiced attacks targeted at one particular transgender swimmer. We urge the FINA to rethink its policy and ensure inclusion for all athletes — including transgender women – and allow them to participate in sports free from discrimination, abuse and harassment.

“To the young athletes who may be disheartened by this policy, know that we know and believe that every young person deserves to be treated with dignity and respect and that transgender kids, like their friends, deserve the same chances to learn sportsmanship, self-discipline, and teamwork, and to build a sense of belonging with their peers,” Madison added.

Swimming Body FINA Votes To Segregate Trans Athletes | 10 News First:

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Sports

Poll finds majority of Americans oppose trans athletes in female sports teams

Washington Post and University of Maryland conducted survey

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Pennsylvania State University swimmer Lia Thomas competed on the women’s swim team and became the first transgender person to win an NCAA Division 1 national championship. (Screen capture via YouTube))

As the nationwide debate over transgender athletes’ involvement in sports teams corresponding to their gender identity continues, the Washington Post on Tuesday released a new poll identifying where Americans stand on the issue.

The new poll, conducted by the Washington Post and the University of Maryland, found that a majority of Americans oppose trans women and girls’ involvement in female sports. 

According to the poll, which surveyed more than 1,500 Americans, 55 percent were opposed to trans athletes participating in female high school sports. Similarly, the poll found that 58 percent were opposed to trans athletes competing on both college and professional female sports teams. 

The only sports category in which there was not majority opposition was on the question of trans athletes’ involvement in youth female sports teams. Forty-nine percent opposed their involvement at this level, while 33 percent supported it. Seventeen percent answered as having no opinion on the topic.

The poll’s findings contrast a growing overall acceptance among the population for those who identify as trans. 

Roughly 40 percent of those polled by the Post said that greater acceptance of trans people in society was good, compared to 25 percent who believed such to be bad. The findings remained relatively consistent with polling done earlier this year by the Pew Research Center that found similar attitudes that favored accepting trans individuals.

And as the share of young Americans identifying as trans has begun to rise, so too have the rates of Americans in recent years that have favored more social acceptance. However, the country’s perception on the issue of trans women and girls competing in female sports has remained stagnant. Some of the most prominent debate came earlier this year after Pennsylvania State University swimmer Lia Thomas competed on the women’s swim team and became the first trans person to win an NCAA Division 1 national championship.

“Trans women competing in women’s sports does not threaten women’s sports as a whole because trans women are a very small minority of all athletes and the NCAA rules regarding trans women competing in women’s sports have been around for 10-plus years,” Thomas said in an interview with ESPN. “And we haven’t seen any massive wave of trans women dominating.”

The results of the poll and renewed debates come as state legislatures across the country have pushed forward efforts in recent years to address what some lawmakers see as an unfair playing field presented by trans athletes’ presence on sports teams. Such efforts have risen in both prominence and frequency as the conversation has continued and remained persistent.

Just one week before the Post released their poll, the Louisiana State Legislature passed a bill that would prohibit trans athletes from competing on women’s and girls’ sports teams at youth, high school and college levels. Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards declined to veto or sign the bill, citing overwhelming support for the bill in the legislature that would have overridden his potential veto. Without requisite opposition, Louisiana will become the 18th state to enact such legislation.

Cathryn Oakley, state legislative director and senior counsel for the Human Rights Campaign, pushed back on both the legislature’s decision to pass the bill as well as Edwards’ decision not to block its passage.

“The radical politicians that engineered this bill are targeting kids who just want to play sports for the same reason all students do — to learn the values of teamwork, to face healthy competition, and to have fun,” Oakley said in a statement. “These children were failed by their leaders.”

Lawmakers in some states that have yet to pass restrictions on trans athletes’ involvement in sports have continued their attempts to do so.

On the same day of the Louisiana bill’s passage, the Pennsylvania Senate voted to advance similar legislation to mandate students in public schools and universities compete on sports teams consistent with their assigned sex at birth. Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf has since indicated his intent to prevent the bill’s passage into law.

“Pennsylvania’s Republican lawmakers are celebrating Pride Month by advancing legislation targeting trans kids,” Wolf wrote on Twitter. “As I’ve said, I will veto this bill if it makes it to my desk.”

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