April 10, 2014 | by Staff reports
Truvada’s use as HIV prevention drug raises concerns
Truvada, Gilead, gay news, Washington Blade

Drug resistance to established regimens can be a major concern. (Photo courtesy of Gilead)

NEW YORK — Debate persists in the gay community over the use of Truvada, a drug hailed as a lifesaver for many with HIV, about its use and effectiveness as a prevention technique for uninfected men who have gay sex without condoms, the AP and other news outlets report.

Many doctors and activists see immense promise for such preventive use of Truvada, and are campaigning hard to raise awareness of it as a crucial step toward reducing new HIV infections, which now total about 50,000 a year in the U.S., the AP reports.

Yet others — despite mounting evidence of Truvada’s effectiveness — say such efforts are reckless, tempting some condom users to abandon that layer of protection and exposing them to an array of other sexually transmitted infections aside from HIV.

“If something comes along that’s better than condoms, I’m all for it, but Truvada is not that,” Michael Weinstein, president of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, was quoted as having said by the AP. “Let’s be honest: It’s a party drug.”

Truvada, produced by California-based Gilead Sciences, has been around for a decade, serving as one of the key drugs used in combination with others as the basic treatment for people who have HIV. However, the drug took on a more contentious aspect in 2012 when the Food and Drug Administration approved it for pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP — in other words, for use to prevent people from getting sexually transmitted HIV in the first place, the AP said.

Since then, critics have warned that many gay men won’t heed Truvada’s once-a-day regimen and complained of its high cost — roughly $13,000 a year. Truvada’s proponents say most insurance plans — including Medicaid programs — now cover prescriptions for it, and they cite studies showing that the blue pill, if taken diligently, can reduce the risk of getting HIV by more than 90 percent, the AP said.

A town hall panel discussion on PrEP is planned for April 28 from 7-9 p.m. at the GLBT Community Center of Baltimore. Visit glccb.org for details.

1 Comment
  • What is important to understand: TRUVADA is indicated in combination with safer sex practices for PrEP to reduce the risk of sexually acquired HIV-1 in adults at high risk.
    Just taking TRUVADA may not keep you from getting HIV-1. You must continue using safer sex practices while you are taking TRUVADA to reduce your risk of getting HIV-1.

© Copyright Brown, Naff, Pitts Omnimedia, Inc. 2014. All rights reserved.
Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin