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‘You see that? Girls can do anything!’

40 years ago, 50 million watched King beat Riggs in ‘Battle of the Sexes’

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Billie Jean King, tennis, sports, gay news, Washington Blade
Billie Jean King, tennis, sports, gay news, Washington Blade

Billie Jean King (Photo by Andrew Coppa Photography)

I know nothing about tennis except that it’s thrilling to watch athletes play the sport. I’m in love with love but am clueless about love on the tennis court. As to a match point, well, I’ve always avoided playing with matches. Yet, when Billie Jean King beat Bobby Riggs in the historic “Battle of the Sexes” 40 years ago this month on Sept. 20, 1973, my life, as was the case with so many women (and men), changed.

The PBS program “American Masters: Billie Jean King,” which commemorates the 40th anniversary of the “Battle of the Sexes” as well as King’s iconic impact on both tennis and the culture, premiered last week. The engaging film, a part of the Emmy-winning series “American Masters,” can be viewed on the website pbs.org/americanmasters. The show highlights King’s founding of the Women’s Tennis Association in 1973, the year when the U.S. Open became the first Grand Slam tournament to award equal prize money to men and women.

Perhaps most movingly for those of us who are queer, King talks in the film about how hard it was for her when she was outed by her lover Marilyn Barrett (who filed a “palimony” suit) before she was at peace with being a lesbian. When the story broke, King told her publicist that she had to be open about being gay. “It’s about being truthful to my audience and to my fans and to the world,” King said, adding, “I’d do anything I can to help the LGBT community.”

Four decades ago, we were mesmerized watching (in person or as an estimated 50 million of us in the United States alone did on TV) the King and Riggs “Battle” at the Astrodome in Houston. King, then 29, and a tennis champion, and now a feminist and queer icon, was carried in, hoisted by hunky young men – like a 20th century Cleopatra. Riggs, now deceased, then 55 and a former tennis champion, was escorted in a rickshaw by beautiful young women – his “bosom buddies.” With a nod to the then emerging (2nd wave) feminist movement and entertainment, the ABC broadcast of the event began with the playing of the showbiz standard “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better” from “Annie Get Your Gun.”

Yet, far more than glamour was at stake in the “Battle of the Sexes” for people not only my generation, but for my parents and, even future generations. It’s hard to imagine how hard things were for girls and women back then. Title IX (legislation prohibiting discrimination based on sex in programs in schools, including sports) was just passed in 1972. Women couldn’t legally have an abortion in many states until the Supreme Court ruled in Roe. v. Wade in 1973. Women had to be tough as nails if they hoped to enter a profession such as the law or the clergy. My Dad, who was a vet, encountered ridicule from some of his professional colleagues when he hired a woman to join his veterinary practice.

In 1973, women’s tennis had only been considered professional for three years. Before that, women tennis players were paid as amateurs – though they were as skillful as their male counterparts. When King accepted Riggs’ challenge (after Riggs said the place for women was not the tennis court but the kitchen and bedroom), she was fighting for women not only in sports, but in all areas of life. When King defeated Riggs it was the victory felt around the world. Men, women, boys and girls saw what women could do. “You see that?” my Dad said to me, after King walloped Riggs, “don’t listen to guys who’ll steer you wrong! Girls can do anything!”

“I like the idea of playing for someone else besides myself,” King says in the “American Masters” film.

Thank you for playing for all of us, Billie Jean King.

Kathi Wolfe is a poet and writer. Her collection “The Green Light” is published by Finishing Line Press.

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1970-1975: How gay liberation movement grew after Stonewall

Converging with civil rights, women’s liberation, anti-war movements

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Members of the Gay Liberation Front at their communal house, 1620 S St. N.W., Washington, D.C., circa 1971. From left to right: Kashi Rahman, Andy Hughes, Guy Charles, Reggie Haynes, Ronnie, David Aiken, Tim Corbett, unknown, Shima Rahman, unknown, Joseph Covert. (Photo courtesy of the Rainbow History Project, Inc./David Aiken Collection)

In conjunction with WorldPride 2025, Rainbow History Project is creating an exhibit on the evolution of Pride: “Pickets, Protests, and Parades: The History of Gay Pride in Washington.” This is the second of 10 articles that will share research themes for the exhibit. In “Gay and Proud,” we discuss the period between 1970-1975 and how the fledgling gay liberation movement burst on the scenes after the Stonewall Riots, converging with the civil rights movement, women’s liberation, and the anti-Vietnam movement.

Inspired by the Black civil rights movement’s affirmation “Black is Beautiful,” the Mattachine Society of Washington coined the phrase “Gay is Good.” From 1965-1969, the Mattachine Society of Washington coordinated some of the first public demonstrations for LGBTQ equality – pickets on Independence Day called the Annual Reminders. The Gay Liberation Front wanted the 1970 Annual Reminder to be held in New York on the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. Thus, the first Christopher Street Liberation Day March took place in New York City on June 28, 1970. Signs in this first CSLD March read “Gay and Proud,” a motto that would come to label the annual Stonewall celebrations. Gay Pride has evolved into what President Biden just proclaimed “LGBTQI+ Pride Month.”

Despite the power shift from D.C.’s pickets and Philadelphia’s reminders to New York’s march, Washingtonians remained central to planning the march and its political demands, while also fostering a sense of community among homosexuals, who were starting to call themselves gays. In October of 1969, Nancy Tucker and Lilli Vincenz created The Gay Blade as a newsletter to be distributed in bars. Now called the Washington Blade, Tucker said this about its founding in a 1998 oral history with Rainbow History Project:

“Sometime after that last Fourth of July picket, the people in Mattachine must have begun to talk about how Mattachine could reach out to the gay community, as a whole in Washington, which they had never done before.”

The Gay Liberation Front DC formed in August 1970 with a communal house at 1620 S St., N.W. Its purposes, laid out by David Aiken, were “to establish a sense of community among gay people, build gay self-awareness, and educate the straight community.” GLF-DC and another group, the Gay Activists Alliance, participated in the 1971 May Day protests, which were large-scale anti-Vietnam War civil disobedience actions.

The following year on May 2-7, 1972, to commemorate May Day, GLF-DC coordinated Washington’s first Gay Pride Week. “Across the country these past two years, gay people have been getting it on for a gala spring festival celebrating the fact that we’re gay, we’re proud and we’re together,” its Gay Pride Bulletin No. 1 said. “Parties, shows, rap sessions, platform speakers, gala public picnics — all designed around the theme of GAY TOGETHERNESS — are being staged to show that gay is good and gay is here to stay!”

The goal: “rich, poor, black, white, male, female, in business or in school, in leather or in drag, in ‘the movement’ or in the closet: Gay Pride will be a time when everybody who’s gay in Washington can come to meet on common ground.” Oral history recordings and documents in the Rainbow History Archives show the event was a success, however, it was the only one that GLF-DC planned. Another “Pride” in DC didn’t occur for several years.

Between 1970-1975, countless D.C. gay organizations formed, and they showed up gay and proud in other events: the Black Panthers Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention, the American Psychology Association’s annual meeting and the Iwo Jima Memorial. They also disrupted conferences at Catholic University and carried anti-Nixon banners at his second inaugural. Our WorldPride 2025 exhibit, “Pickets, Protests, and Parades: The History of Gay Pride in Washington,” centers the voices of the event organizers and includes the critics of Pride and the intersection of Pride and other movements for equal rights and liberation. But we need your help to do that: we are looking for images and input, so look around your attic and get involved.

Vincent Slatt volunteers as the director of archiving at the Rainbow History Project; Elinor Aspegren is a member of RHP. Visit rainbowhistory.org to get involved.

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Trans people still face uphill battle in finding employment

We must combat transphobia in the workplace

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Transgender people face a major crisis and have faced this crisis for a long time: not being able to find meaningful employment. This is nothing new to think about or say. Trans people have historically been unemployed since the beginning of time.

According to the Movement Advancement Project, trans workers experience unemployment at twice the rate of the normal population (14% versus 7%). Moreover, 44% of trans people who are currently working are underemployed. Lastly, according to this project, trans people are about four times more likely than the average population to have a household income of under $10,000. These numbers are alarming and should be studied closely.

There are many reasons why employers hire fewer trans workers. For one, trans people who don’t fully pass as the gender they want — and nonbinary people — don’t fit the traditional mold of someone who companies want in their office. Most companies prefer to have individuals who either look rigidly male or rigidly female, and don’t want workers who look somewhere in between.

Secondly, employers might be conscious of the fact that trans people face mental health challenges, such as a suicide rate of around 50%, and are at risk for greater depression, anxiety, and other issues. Our mental health problems might get in the way of work, or cause us to take more leave than others.

Thirdly, many company recruiters might just straightforwardly be transphobic, and view the trans population as strange, weird, or, at worst ugly — as if we are people to look down upon and not people to uphold. They might not recruit us out of a pure disdain for our identity and willingness to change genders.

Fourthly, recruiters might realize that current employees in their company are transphobic and would not get along with a trans employee. This leads them to avoid recruiting trans people out of the intention of keeping their office space rid of debate and interpersonal conflict.

There are many other reasons why companies don’t hire trans people, too many reasons for me to consider or explore. Maybe companies feel that trans people are historically undereducated, and poor to begin with, and will have a hard time acclimating to prestigious white collar work environments.

Either way, the unemployment crisis in the trans population has been going on for a quite a while, and needs to be addressed.

Luckily, trans people find some outlets for success in certain industries. The nonprofit industry has been relatively kind to trans folk, as have creative communities, like some parts of the music industry, and the visual arts industry. Filmmakers are constantly looking for a new story about trans people. The publishing and education industries are also somewhat kind to us.

Certain Democratic political campaigns will also hire us and other progressive and liberal causes. But there are still many industries that look down upon us, and frown upon our identity. Donald Trump instituted a transgender military ban, and the Army, Navy, and other branches have historically been transphobic places to work and reside in.

Overall, trans people face a steep uphill battle in finding adequate and meaningful employment. This is a crisis that has been going on for decades. I’m not sure how to fix this problem – both states and the federal government can surely implement more legislation that convinces companies to hire trans people just as equally as they would hire anyone else. More provisions need to be put in place to sue companies for firing a trans person just solely based on their gender identity.

Ensuring employment for all gender nonconforming folk will make our lives infinitely better, and ensuring that we don’t face transphobia in the workplace will make them even better as well.

Isaac Amend is a writer based in the D.C. area. With two poetry books out, he writes for the Blade and the Yale Daily News. He is a transgender man and was featured in National Geographic’s ‘Gender Revolution.’ He serves on the board of the LGBT Democrats of Virginia. Contact him at [email protected] or on Instagram at: @literatipapi.

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Trump and his MAGA cult just got scarier

GOP platform, selection of Vance reinforce his extremism

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Former U.S. President Donald Trump and Sen. JD Vance (R-Ohio) attend the Republican National Convention last night. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

It’s hard to imagine Donald Trump and his MAGA cult getting scarier, but they just did with his naming of Ohio Sen. JD Vance as his running mate, and approval of the GOP platform.

When Trump was shot, Vance said, “Today is not just some isolated incident. The central premise of the Biden campaign is that President Donald Trump is an authoritarian fascist who must be stopped at all costs. That rhetoric led directly to President Trump’s attempted assassination.” In essence, because Biden told the truth, it’s his fault. Vance is a radical MAGA Republican.

Then the platform was passed on the first day of the Republican National Convention. It protects white Christians, attacks transgender people, and says states can make any anti-abortion laws they want. It is an agenda that will hurt everyone who isn’t white, straight, and Christian.

Then, on the same day, the Trump classified documents case was dismissed by MAGA judge Aileen Cannon. The only thing good one can say about Judge Cannon dismissing this case, for a reason all legitimate legal scholars say is nonsense, is she proves beyond a doubt she is in Trump’s pocket. While I am sure this will eventually be overturned, the only way to ensure it gets tried is to defeat Trump, and all his sycophants, at the polls. Between the Republican Supreme Court, and unqualified judges like Cannon, the country must understand what re-electing Trump would do in the long run. It will destroy our democracy, including our judicial system.

The time for decent, democracy-loving people, to stand up is now, before it is too late. I am reminded of history when the German people believed Hitler could be dealt with, and they didn’t believe what he said he would do. Many Jews, and members of the LGBTQ community, believed they could get by and survive him. They were wrong. Here in America Trump has already proven he will go after women, and the LGBTQ community. He brought out troops to shut down Black Lives Matter protests. He has pledged to deport millions of immigrants, and make life intolerable for the young as he denies climate change. He asked to be bribed by oil executives so they can drill for more oil. The only way you could be OK is if you are white and rich. He will give you more tax deductions. He threatens more widespread tariffs, which will increase inflation, falling heavily on the poor and middle class.

His advisers are pledged to enact Project 2025, which among other things, does away with the Federal Deposit Insurance Program, so your bank accounts will no longer be insured. He commits to getting rid of the Department of Education. He doesn’t support relief for any college debt, and will continue the absurdity of not allowing college debt to be included in a bankruptcy, all things that will make life even more difficult for young people. Believe it will happen, just believe what Trump and his acolytes say. Read Project 2025 and believe what you are reading. Believe when Trump says he will be a dictator, and use federal agencies to get back at his enemies. And you are the enemy if you are not white, Christian, and straight. Remember when Trump was president, you woke up every morning afraid of what he dreamt up during the night. Those rantings will now appear on Truth Social, his media company, each morning.

He will feel free to call out the troops to the border, or to stop any demonstration he doesn’t like. He admires Hitler and Putin, and wants to be like them. Does reading this scare you? Good, it should, as it’s the truth. Even if you only think half of what I write is the truth, that should be enough to frighten you away from Trump and Vance. His appointed Supreme Court has now given the president carte blanche to do as he pleases, without worrying about ever being held to account. Know that Trump will use all that power, and make our lives hell.

If you don’t feel attacked now, just remember a poem written by German clergyman, Martin Niemoller. Its idea is appropriate today. It reads: “First they came for the Communists, and I didn’t speak up, because I wasn’t a Communist. Then they came for the Jews, and I didn’t speak up, because I wasn’t a Jew. Then they came for the Catholics, and I didn’t speak up, because I was a Protestant. Then they came for me, and by that time there was no one left to speak up for me.”

Peter Rosenstein is a longtime LGBTQ rights and Democratic Party activist. He writes regularly for the Blade.

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