September 3, 2015 at 7:11 pm EDT | by Chris Johnson
2016 hopefuls take to Twitter over Kim Davis

Mike Huckabee, gay news, Washington Blade

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee supports Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis. (Photo by David Ball; courtesy Wikimedia Commons).

Following news on Thursday Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis was found in contempt of court and jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, a number of 2016 presidential candidates took to Twitter to express their views on her fate.

The candidate expressing the greatest solidarity with Davis was former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who said jailing her for refusing marriage licenses over religious objections amounts to the criminalization of Christianity in the United States.

Huckabee, who’s said the Supreme Court’s historic ruling in favor of same-sex marriage is invalid without additional legislative action, said in a subsequent tweet he plans a trip to Kentucky on Tuesday to support Davis.

Additional tweets link to a page on his campaign website called “Free Kim Davis Now” and calls on President Obama, U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and U.S. District Judge David Bunning to immediate release the clerk from federal custody.

The Republican candidate also questioned why Davis is not jail and not Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton — presumably over her email controversy.

Clinton is at the other end of spectrum of presidential candidates on Davis. In a tweet linking to an Associated Press report about the clerk’s punishment, the Democratic candidate suggested she supports the judge’s decision.

It’s unclear whether Clinton herself was responsible for the tweet because the ones signed by her are marked with an “-H.” (UPDATE: A Clinton spokesperson told the Blade the tweet should be attributed to the campaign itself).

Somewhere in the middle of these candidates was former New York Gov. George Pataki, who took to Twitter to say Davis must follow the rule of law. The candidate compared her decision to withhold marriage licenses to “sanctuary cities” that have pledged not to prosecute undocumented immigrants.

Former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina raised a question on Twitter about why Davis is in jail, but not Lois Lerner, a former Internal Revenue Service employee at the center of the 2013 IRS controversy. Her tweet seemingly corrects her earlier comment during an radio interview with conservative commentator Hugh Hewitt in which she said Davis’ actions were “not appropriate.”

Chris Johnson is Chief Political & White House Reporter for the Washington Blade. Johnson is a member of the White House Correspondents' Association. Follow Chris

3 Comments
  • Ha! Mike Huckabee, the Dominionist who wants the Constitution replaced by a new version based on the Bible, is questioning why a criminal who has violated her oath of office, misappropriated public funds by accepting a taxpayer funded salary while not performing her duties, violated federal law by creating a hostile work environment, AND disobeyed a Court Order has been sent to jail until she submits to the rule of law. Of course he is.

  • When you’re right, you’re right. Obama should be in jail, if for no other reason, he is disobeying immigration laws. Hillary telling people to uphold the law! That is brass! She broke the law with her private email server, not to mention putting State secrets out there for any kid with a laptop to hack. (Though, unfortunately, I’m betting someone a little more devious than that beat him to it.). What a joke! Our government is the laughingstock of the world.

  • If a Government official is jailed or incapacitated, surely a deputy takes over the role pro-temp until the official returns or a new person is appointed. This keeps Government working. Do these candidates for elected office really believe that Government can stop carrying out its duties for its citizens due to one individual’s personal beliefs? This is not supporting a martyr but allowing people to be discriminated against.

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