December 23, 2017 at 1:31 pm EST | by Staff reports
Gays less likely to report good sleep: study
sleep, gay news, Washington Blade

Gay men are significantly more likely to have trouble falling asleep, require medication to overcome insomnia or wake feeling unrested compared to straight or bisexual males, according to a study.

ATLANTA — Gay people are more likely to experience trouble sleeping, new research finds according to the Daily Mail.

Gay men are significantly more likely to have trouble falling asleep, require medication to overcome insomnia or wake feeling unrested compared to straight or bisexual males, a study published in the journal Sleep Health finds.

Lesbians are more at risk of struggling to fall or stay asleep, needing anti-insomnia drugs to help them nod off and feeling they need more shut eye in the morning, the research adds.

Previous findings reveal gay or bisexual people are more likely to smoke and suffer severe psychological stress, both of which disturb sleep, the Daily Mail reports.

Over a year, up to 40 percent of U.S. citizens report suffering from insomnia. Long term lack of sleep has been linked to poor heart health, depression and an increased risk of early death.

Researchers from the National Center for Health Statistics in Atlanta analyzed 46,909 men and 56,080 women who took part in the National Health Interview Survey between 2013-2015, the Daily Mail reports. The study’s participants were asked how many hour sleeps they get on average in a 24-hour period.

This was then compared to the National Sleep Foundation’s recommendations of seven to nine hours for adults aged between 18-64 years old, and seven to eight hours for those 65 and over. They were also asked if they had trouble falling or staying asleep, had used insomnia medication or woken feeling unrested at least four times in the past week. Their sexual orientation was also noted, the Daily Mail reports.

Results reveal gay men are significantly more likely to have trouble falling asleep, require medication to overcome insomnia or wake feeling unrested compared to straight or bisexual males, the Daily Mail reports. Lesbians are more likely to struggle to fall or stay asleep, need anti-insomnia drugs to help them nod off and feel poorly rested in the morning.

Bisexual women are more at-risk of having difficulty falling and staying asleep compared to straight females, the Daily Mail reports.

Comments are closed
© Copyright Brown, Naff, Pitts Omnimedia, Inc. 2018. All rights reserved.