January 13, 2014 | by Chris Johnson
Kerry says U.S. ‘deeply concerned’ about Nigeria anti-gay law
Gay News, Washington Blade, John Kerry

Secretary of State John Kerry says the United States is “deeply concerned” about the Nigeria anti-gay law (photo public domain).

Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday the United States is “deeply concerned” about a draconian anti-gay measure signed into law in Nigeria that includes punishments of up to 14 years in prison.

“The United States is deeply concerned by Nigeria’s enactment of the Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act,” Kerry said. “Beyond even prohibiting same sex marriage, this law dangerously restricts freedom of assembly, association, and expression for all Nigerians.”

According to Reuters, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan signed the measure on Monday. It contains penalties of up to 14 years in prison and bans not only same-sex marriage and same-sex “amorous relationships,” but also membership in LGBT rights groups.

Kerry’s said the Nigeria law is “inconsistent” with country’s international legal obligations and “undermines” democratic reforms as well as human rights protections within Nigeria’s constitution.

“People everywhere deserve to live in freedom and equality,” Kerry concludes. “No one should face violence or discrimination for who they are or who they love. We join with those in Nigeria who appeal for the protection of their fellow citizens’ fundamental freedoms and universal human rights.”

The national assembly had passed the measure last May, but the Nigerian president reportedly had delayed signing it into law.

A White House official said Kerry’s statement on the anti-gay law “reflects our views,” but referred to the State Department for more information.

Kerry’s full statement follows:

STATEMENT BY SECRETARY KERRY

Deep Concern with Nigeria’s Enactment of the Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act

 

The United States is deeply concerned by Nigeria’s enactment of the Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act.

Beyond even prohibiting same sex marriage, this law dangerously restricts freedom of assembly, association, and expression for all Nigerians.

Moreover, it is inconsistent with Nigeria’s international legal obligations and undermines the democratic reforms and human rights protections enshrined in its 1999 Constitution.

People everywhere deserve to live in freedom and equality.  No one should face violence or discrimination for who they are or who they love.

We join with those in Nigeria who appeal for the protection of their fellow citizens’ fundamental freedoms and universal human rights.

Chris Johnson is Chief Political & White House Reporter for the Washington Blade. Johnson attends the daily White House press briefings and is a member of the White House Correspondents' Association. Follow Chris

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