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Santa Fe begins issuing marriage licenses to gay couples

Dozens of same-sex couples hold impromptu mass wedding

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gay marriage, same-sex marriage, marriage equality, New Mexico, Santa Fe, gay news, Washington Blade
gay marriage, same-sex marriage, marriage equality, New Mexico, Santa Fe, gay news, Washington Blade

Dozens of same-sex couples hold an impromptu mass same-sex wedding in Santa Fe (Photo courtesy of ProgressNowNM).

A county clerk in Santa Fe started issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples on Friday, resulting in dozens of gay couples marrying in a mass wedding.

Santa Fe County Clerk Geraldine Salazar started issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples on Friday afternoon. The first gay couple to receive a marriage license in the county was Liz Stefanics, a Santa Fe county commissioner, and her partner Linda Siegle, a longtime LGBT activist.

Afterwards, at least a dozen recipients of the county’s first licenses held an impromptu mass same-sex wedding in the chambers of the county commission just minutes after receiving their licenses. The couples were pronounced legally married at 3:51 pm.

On Thursday, District Judge Sarah Singleton issued the order for the county to issue the marriage licenses, according to the Associated Press, and was quoted as saying in the decision that “reading a sex or sexual orientation requirement into the laws of New Mexico violates the state constitution.” Singleton reportedly ordered the clerk to grant marriage licenses to gay couples or appear in court Sept. 26 to tell her why that shouldn’t happen.

But in a statement that was read to the Washington Blade by her secretary Jackie Roberson, Singleton clarified the decision was an alternative writ of mandamus and not a decision based on the merits. Apparently, the clerk chose to begin issuing licenses rather than respond to the petition.

“That alternative writ says to do what the petitioner asks or show cause on a specific date why the clerk should not to do that,” Singleton said through the proxy. “An alternative writ is merely a way of giving the respondent a specific time to come in and answer the petition. It does not represent a decision on the merits.”

Singleton’s decision was the result of a lawsuit filed by State Rep. Brian Egolf on behalf by two Santa Fe men. In a statement provided by Progress NOW NM, Salazar explains her decision to begin distributing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

“Now that Judge Singleton has ordered me to issue a license to Messrs. Hanna and Hudson on constitutional grounds, I intend to do so and to issue a license to any same-sex couple who desires one and are otherwise qualified,” Salazar said. “By complying with the judge’s order, we will be issuing licenses legally and will not continue to use limited county resources on further litigation.”

Pat Davis of ProgressNow New Mexico said in a statement the developments marks a historic development for New Mexico.

“After so many years of seeing these couples have their hopes raised, then dashed it is so rewarding to see progress finally coming,” Davis said. “Elected leaders with political courage stepped forward to do the right thing and we will be forever grateful. And no state could have done marriage equality better.  What could be cooler than a mass gay wedding in Santa Fe to celebrate marriage equality?”

The clerk began distributing the licenses to gay couples two days after Doña Ana County Clerk Lynn Ellins began doing the same on his own accord. According to ProgressNOW NM, nearly 100 same-sex couples were married in the county by the start of the next day.

New Mexico Attorney General Gary King said he wouldn’t stop Dona Ana County from issuing marriage licenses for gay couples. He’s previously said he won’t defend New Mexico law against lawsuits seeking marriage equality because he believes that the current statute is unconstitutional. Republican state lawmakers have said they’d intervene to stop the same-sex marriages from occurring.

In the spring, the Santa Fe City Council approved a resolution stating marriage equality was already legal in New Mexico because of the gender-neutral construction of the marriage law after Santa Fe officials, including Mayor David Coss, first proposed the measure in March.

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Virginia

Suspect in 1996 murder of lesbian couple in Shenandoah National Park identified

Convicted serial rapist died in prison in 2018

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Laura 'Lollie' Winans and Julianne 'Julie' Williams (Photo courtesy of the FBI)

The FBI has identified a then-48-year-old man from Ohio who it describes as a convicted serial rapist as the person it believes committed the May 1996 murder of a lesbian couple at their campsite in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia.

In a statement released on June 20, the FBI says newly analyzed DNA evidence and an extensive review of other evidence surrounding the 28-year-old murder case has enabled it to identify Walter Leo Jackson, Sr., as the prime suspect in the murders of Laura “Lollie” Winans, 26, and Julianne “Julie” Williams, 24. 

The FBI statement says the two women’s bodies were found on June 1, 1996, after an extensive search by rangers with the National Park Service after family members reported them missing. 

“In 2021, a new FBI Richmond investigative team was assigned to conduct a methodic review of the case,” the statement says. “FBI special agents, intelligence analysts, and other FBI Richmond employees reassessed hundreds of leads and interviews,” according to the statement. “They spent countless hours to identify and prioritize evidence from the crime scene to retest and submit the items to an accredited private lab.”

It says the lab successfully extracted DNA from several items of evidence and, with help from Virginia State Police, and through the FBI’s Combined DNA Index System a positive DNA match to Jackson was obtained. 

“Those results confirmed we had the right man and finally could tell the victim’s families we know who is responsible for this heinous crime,” Stanley M. Meador, the FBI Richmond special agent in charge, said in the statement. 

“After 28 years, we are now able to say who committed the brutal murders of Lollie Winans and Julie Williams in Shenandoah National Park,” U.S. Attorney Christopher R. Kavanaugh said in the statement. “I want to again extend my condolences to the Winans and Williams families and hope today’s announcement provides some small measure of solace,” he said. 

The FBI statement says Jackson, who died in prison in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, in March 2018, had a lengthy criminal record that included kidnapping, rapes, and assaults. It says Jackson worked as a residential painter and “was an avid hiker and was known to visit Shenandoah National Park.”

Walter Leo Jackson, Sr. (Photo courtesy of the FBI)

The FBI has stated in past statements regarding the two women’s murders that it did not have evidence to classify the murders as a hate crime in which Jackson targeted the women because of their sexual orientation. 

Media reports at the time of the murders identified Williams as a native of Minnesota who moved to Vermont, where she helped form a group supportive of LGBTQ people with a Presbyterian church ministry. Winans was a wilderness guide in Michigan and met Williams through an outdoor program in Minnesota called “Woodswomen,” media reports said. 

A report in the Advocate published before the FBI’s identification of Jackson as the man responsible for the women’s murders, said the two women had been dating for about two years before their murders. It reported they had planned to move in together that summer to a home in Huntington, Vt., and that Williams had recently accepted a new job as a geologist at a location near Lake Champlain in Vermont. 

“The FBI will continue to work with law enforcement partners to determine if Jackson is responsible for other unsolved crimes,” the FBI’s June 20 statement says. “Anyone with information on Jackson should call 1-800-CALL FBI or submit it online at tips.fbi.gov,” the statement concludes.

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District of Columbia

Bernie Delia, attorney, beloved Capital Pride organizer, dies at 68

Activist worked at Justice Department, White House as attorney

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Bernie Delia (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Bernie Delia, a founding member of the Capital Pride Alliance, the group that organizes most D.C. LGBTQ Pride events, and who served most recently as co-chair of World Pride 2025, which D.C. will be hosting next June, died unexpectedly on Friday, June 21, according to a statement released by Capital Pride Alliance. He was 68.

“It is with great sadness that the Capital Pride Alliance mourns the passing of Bernie Delia,” the statement says. “We will always reflect on his life and legacy as a champion, activist, survivor, mentor, friend, leader, and a true inspiration to the LGBTQ+ community.”

The statement says that in addition to serving six years as the Capital Pride Alliance board president, Delia served for several years as president of Dignity Washington, the local LGBTQ Catholic organization, where he helped create “an environment for spiritual enrichment during the height of the AIDS epidemic.”

“He also had a distinguished legal career, serving as one of the first openly gay appointees at the U.S. Department of Justice and later as an appellate attorney,” the statement reads.

Delia’s LinkedIn page shows that he worked at the U.S. Department of Justice for 26 years, serving as an assistant U.S. attorney from 2001 to 2019. Prior to that, he served from 1997 to 2001 as associate deputy attorney general and from 1994 to 1997 served as senior counsel to the director of the Executive Office for United States Attorneys, which provides executive and administrative support for 93 U.S. attorneys located throughout the country.

His LinkedIn page shows he served from January-June 1993 as deputy director of the Office of Presidential Personnel during the administration of President Bill Clinton, in which he was part of the White House staff. And it shows he began his career as legal editor of the Bureau of National Affairs, which published news reports on legal issues, from 1983-1993.

The Capital Pride Alliance statement describes Delia as “an avid runner who served as the coordinator of the D.C. Front Runners and Stonewall Kickball LGBTQ sports groups.”

“He understood the value, purpose, and the urgency of the LGBTQ+ community to work together and support one another,” the statement says. “He poured his soul into our journey toward World Pride, which was a goal of his from the start of his involvement with Capital Pride.”

The statement adds, “Bernie will continue to guide us forward to ensure we meet this important milestone as we gather with the world to be visible, heard, and authentic. We love you, Bernie!”

In a statement posted on social media, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said she and her administration were “heartbroken” over the news of Delia’s passing.

“Bernie leaves behind an incredible legacy in our city and country — through his life and advocacy, he helped pave a path for LGBTQIA+ residents in our city and within the federal government to live and work openly and proudly,” the mayor says in her statement.

“He helped transform Capital Pride into one of the largest and most inclusive Pride celebrations in the nation — a true reflection and representation of our people and values,” the statement says. “This is the D.C. that Bernie helped build and that he leaves behind.”

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Africa

Prominent South African activist elected to country’s parliament

Steve Letsike founded Access Chapter 2

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Steve Letsike (Photo courtesy of Steve Letsike)

A prominent South African LGBTQ activist has won a seat in the country’s parliament.

Steve Letsike, a lesbian woman who founded Access Chapter 2, a South African advocacy group, is a member of the African National Congress. She is also part of the ANC’s National Executive Committee that determines the party’s direction.

Letsike won a seat in the South African National Assembly in national and provincial elections that took place on May 29.

The ANC lost its parliamentary majority that it had had since Nelson Mandela in 1994 won the South African presidency in the country’s first post-apartheid elections. MPs earlier this month re-elected President Cyril Ramaphosa after the ANC invited the Democratic Alliance and other parties to form a Government of National Unity.

Letsike in a statement to the Washington Blade described her election as “a milestone for the people of South Africa, and also affirmative of our party’s posture that is inclusive and intention to transformation agenda.”

“I am not in parliament for myself but the people that trusted the ANC to send individuals that will put people first,” said Letsike. “In that cohort that includes the LGBTI people like myself. Rooted in the teaching of a just society, that seeks equality and believes in the rule of law. That demand on developmental agenda from a queer lens and clear priorities of the people is important.” 

“I am delighted by this task, trust and hope for our people,” she added.

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