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Forget minivans — crossovers are all the rage

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crossovers, gay news, Washington Blade, haulers
crossovers, gay news, Washington Blade, haulers

Lincoln MKC

Forget frumpy minivans. With record sales last month, crossovers and other haulers are as hot as Marvel’s Avengers. That’s due to super-low gas prices, some chiseled styling worthy of a sexy superhero and enough tech gadgetry to rival your smartphone.

 

LINCOLN MKC

$36,000

 

Mpg: 20 city/29 highway

 

0-to-60 mph: 8 seconds

 

MKC…MKS…MKT…MKX…MKZ. Really, could Lincoln think of a more confusing way to name its vehicles? Luckily, some re-badging—i.e., bringing back the Continental nameplate—is in sight. But for now, crossover shoppers who can overlook this minor kerfuffle will find the compact MKC a fine ride. Lincoln now offers new-age styling and some Tony Stark-like features: there are shift buttons on the dash instead of the usual gear-shift near the center console, and a MyKey system lets parents set maximum speed, radio volume and other parameters for teenagers. The MyLincoln app gives you remote start, parking-meter timer and status checks for fuel, tire pressure, etc. There’s also an automated parallel-parking system and a hands-free, power liftgate with foot sensor to easily load/unload cargo. Another plus: The swanky cabin has ambient mood lighting and a jammin’ 14-speaker stereo—perfect for road trips.

SUBARU FORESTER

crossovers, gay news, Washington Blade, haulers

Subaru Forester

 

$24,000

 

Mpg: 23 city/28 highway

 

0-to-60 mph: 9 seconds

 

The Subaru Forester has a robust turbo engine, rugged all-wheel drive and roomy stowage area big enough for bikes and other large items. The snappy styling (updated last year) is aerodynamic, and the elevated seating means great visibility for the driver. With the exception of a rearview camera (now standard on all models), the base Forester is fairly barebones. But trade up to any other trim level, and there are gizmos galore: power liftgate, one-touch folding rear seatback, panoramic sunroof, Harman Kardon audio and more. One downside: the touchscreen is subpar compared with more tech-savvy offerings from the competition. Along with a knee airbag (for the driver), lane-departure warning and a nifty collision-avoidance system that uses automatic braking, the Forester has high crash-test ratings.

VOLVO V60 T6 R-DESIGN

crossovers, gay news, Washington Blade, haulers

Volvo V60 T6 R-Design

$47,000

 

Mpg: 19 city/28 highway

 

0-to-60 mph: 4.9 seconds

 

From the land of Thor, the Volvo V60 wagon looks like a muscled crossover. The T6 R-Design—the high-performance model—is almost as fast a thunderbolt. There’s crisp steering, grippy tires and—hello, this is Volvo—tons of safety gear: active front head restraints, blind-spot monitoring (with rear cross-traffic alert), drowsy-driver warning and a front-end collision system that also can detect pedestrians and cyclists. To handle even the stormiest weather, there are heated front/rear seats, heated mirrors, heated steering wheel, heated windshield and heated windshield-washer nozzles. And because of the raised chassis, the V60 can handle a bit of off-roading.

VW TIGUAN SE 4MOTION

crossovers, gay news, Washington Blade, haulers

VW Tiguan SE 4Motion

$32,000

 

Mpg: 21 city/26 highway

 

0-to-60 mph: 7.5 seconds

 

Yes, the design is a bit dated, but why mess with success on a popular crossover? From the perky turbo and exciting Euro handling to the first-rate fit and finish, the Tiguan feels strong and solid. There are more standard features this year, including a rearview camera and VW’s CarNet app for emergency assistance, directions, verifying if your doors are locked, etc. And the leatherette (gussied-up vinyl) seating feels better than real leather. But VW needs to ditch the dinky five-inch touchscreen and replace it with a larger, user-friendly version. And stick-shift fans will mourn the loss of the optional manual transmission.

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Autos

Glam rides: BMW X6 and Range Rover Velar

Impressive standard features elevate these lower-priced options

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BMW X6

Many sport-utes with ho-hum styling still impress me by offering scads of standard features and a low MSRP. But sometimes it’s hard not to be seduced by what I call glam rides—pricier vehicles with plenty of attitude. You know, like something Cassandro might drive. 

BMW X6 

$75,000 

MPG: 23 city/26 highway

0 to 60 mph: 5.2 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 59.6 cu. ft. 

PROS: Outré styling, posh cabin, raw power

CONS: Less rear visibility, limited storage, costly options

IN A NUTSHELL: Trust me, it’s hard not to fall in love with a BMW X6. This recently updated crossover, with its coupe-like profile, swept-back grille and breathtaking acceleration, had me at hello. High ground clearance and oodles of high-tech features turn this high-end hauler into one helluva wild ride.

Sure, the sharply sloped roof hampers rear-seat headroom and cargo capacity. But up front there’s more room than expected, along with a dramatically curved digital dashboard. And the ginormous panoramic moonroof helps make the interior feel quite spacious. 

How good is this BMW? Zipping up to Baltimore last month during a day of downpours and clueless commuters, my husband and I started rethinking our promise to never buy a budget-busting vehicle. For us, bad weather and heavy traffic usually result in clenched teeth, heavy sighs and my swearing like a sailor. Yet the hushed cabin, 16-way power front seats and ability to control the stereo and other functions simply by waving my hand were all very Zen. Ditto the finely tuned suspension, steering and braking, which anticipated my every move. Instead of shying away from rush hour on our return home, I leaned in. 

Myriad safety features — from forward-collision alerts and blind-spot monitors to lane-departure warnings and a 360-degree camera — batted away any concerns about fender benders. Same for the option packages that allow you to park the X6 automatically, store familiar maneuvers and drive hands-free at up to 85 mph.  

Power in the base-model — which is what I test drove — comes from a lively 375-hp turbo, with a 48-volt hybrid system to improve gas mileage. There’s also a smooth eight-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive for sure handling on slippery roads. Pricing begins at $75,000, but options on my test car brought it up to—whoa!—88,000. 

For more grit and growl, there’s the xDrive60i, with a 523-hp twin turbo that helps this Bimmer sprint from 0 to 60 mph in 4.2 seconds. And the top-of-the-line X6 M Competition with a 617-hp V8 is even faster at a blistering 3.7 seconds. But I am much too afraid to drive this gnarly high-test model—it starts at $128,000. 

RANGE ROVER VELAR

$63,000 

MPG: 19 city/25 highway

0 to 60 mph: 5.2 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 70.1 cu. ft. 

PROS: Refined design, chic interior, lotsa storage

CONS: Tepid base engine, more sedate handling, pricey

IN A NUTSHELL: While Range Rovers are known for being oh-so-classy, the Velar is much sassier than the rest of the lineup. 

The sweeping front fascia would make Ariana Grande proud: Svelte grille, sporty wraparound headlights and stretched, corset-like air ducts in the bumper.  

Inside, the look is spartan but elegant. All knobs and other switchgear are mostly hidden or activated by an 11.4-inch infotainment touchscreen that seems to hover in front of the dash. Even the ubiquitous cruise control and stereo buttons on the steering wheel seem to have vanished, though look closer and they are tastefully integrated into the design. 

While the Velar may be classified as a compact vehicle, it looks and feels much larger. Compared with the midsize BMW X6, both have ample seating for five people. Front-seat dimensions are practically the same, but the supposedly smaller Range Rover has better back-seat headroom and legroom. It also holds almost 20% more cargo. 

Built on the same platform as the popular Jaguar F-Pace, the Velar has a relaxed ride compared to the more athletic BMW X6. Power is less aggressive on the Range Rover, with choice of two competent but hardly rip-roaring engines. 

Build quality is impressive, including the optional leather-free interior that uses an upscale composite of wool and polyurethane. And while even the base-model comes with interior ambient lighting and a premium Meridian stereo, you can opt for the 17-speaker 3D system for an even more “Maestro”-like experience.  

Overall, the Velar may be less of a rabble rouser than the BMW X6, but there’s still plenty here to dazzle the senses. 

Range Rover Velar
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Autos

Rugged yet ritzy: Ford Bronco, Nissan Pathfinder

One offers retro design, the other an edgy and chic look

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Ford Bronco

Both the Ford Bronco and Nissan Pathfinder have rough-and-ready reputations. Each boasts butch bona fides and some nifty off-road capability. But dig a bit deeper into your wallet, and you can step up to higher trim levels for added power and a bit more bling. 

FORD BRONCO HERITAGE LIMITED EDITION

$70,000 

MPG: 17 city/17 highway

0 to 60 mph: 6.2 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 77.6 cu. ft. 

PROS: Retro design, rousing engine rumble, myriad amenities

CONS: Low fuel economy, bouncy ride, pricey

IN A NUTSHELL: After a 24-year hiatus, the Ford Bronco came galloping back to showrooms in 2021. Today there are nine trim levels, including the Heritage Limited Edition that I just finished test driving for a week. At $70,000, this Bronco—second only to the $90,000 Raptor—still costs a pretty penny: $30,000 more than the entry-level model. Yet the higher price is worth it, with a gritty V6 turbo that offers much more giddy-up than the standard four-cylinder engine. 

There’s also a rad retro design, with heritage-style graphics, multiple skid plates, and special bumpers and fenders. Exterior colors—especially the Robin’s Egg Blue, coupled with a white grille and white roof—are a nice throwback to the 1960s. So are the removable doors and roof panels for a safari-like look à la an old-timey “Wild Kingdom” episode. 

Yes, the Bronco is a truck-based SUV, so expect more bounciness than in a Lexus or a Lincoln. But the stable steering and comfortable seats help make up for it. Ground clearance is high, thanks to large 35-inch mud-terrain tires. Luckily, running boards and numerous rubber-lined grab handles make it easy to climb in and out. 

Despite the sound-deadening insulation, there’s still a fair amount of exterior wind noise at high speeds. But this makes it easier to hear the sweet sound of the Bronco’s strong whinny, er, exhaust growl. 

Along with a vibe that’s decidedly old-school cool, this mid-sizer comes with lots of modern amenities: keyless entry, remote start, heated seats, ambient lighting, dual-zone automatic climate control, 360-degree surround-view camera and 10-speaker premium B&O stereo. New this year is a larger, 12-inch touchscreen. I also liked the huge stowage area, with convenient cargo straps to hold down gear, a flip-up rear window for easy access, and a swing-out door to hold a full-size spare tire. 

I guess you could say Ford wasn’t horsing around when it decided to add such a fully loaded Bronco to the stable. 

NISSAN PATHFINDER ROCK CREEK

$44,000

MPG: 20 city/23 highway

0 to 60 mph: 7.0 seconds

Maximum cargo room: 80.4 cu. ft. 

PROS: Roomy, comfy, muted cabin

CONS: So-so gas mileage, tight third row, many competitors 

IN A NUTSHELL: Seeking an SUV that’s more diamonds than denim? Then consider the Nissan Pathfinder, also redesigned just a few years ago and a big step up from the previous model. But instead of retro styling like a Ford Bronco, the look here is a combo of edgy and chic. 

That’s especially true with the Rock Creek version, which sports an aggressive front fascia, grille inserts, trendy black cladding, raised off-road suspension, all-terrain tires and tubular roof rack that can hold 220 pounds. “Rock Creek” badging, which is stamped on the side panels and rear liftgate, is also embroidered in stylish orange contrast stitching on the water-resistant seats. All-wheel drive — optional on all other trims — is standard here. And Rock Creek towing capacity, which is 3,500 pounds on most other Pathfinders, is an impressive 6,000 pounds.

The spacious cabin has enough room for up to eight passengers, though third-row legroom is tight. In the second row, you can opt for a pair of captain’s chairs instead of a three-person bench seat. Regardless, those rear seats are heated, which is a nice touch. 

Nissan has done a good job of making vehicles that feel as rich and luxurious as those in its high-end Infiniti lineup. On the Pathfinder, that means thicker glass and extra insulation for a whisper-quiet cabin. There’s also brushed-aluminum trim and a sporty flat-bottom steering wheel with paddle shifters. Along with smartphone integration, wireless charging pad and voice-command capability, other tech features include a windshield head-up display, 360-degree bird’s-eye camera, ambient interior lighting, 13-speaker Bose stereo and a slew of safety options. 

Nissan Pathfinder

When comparing the Ford Bronco with the Nissan Pathfinder, it’s hard to resist the rip-roaring ride of a fun and feisty Bronco. But the more practical Pathfinder is still plenty adventurous, especially with all the goodies that come in the Rock Creek.

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Autos

Retro rides: Dodge Hornet PHEV, VW ID.Buzz Microbus

Everything old is new again

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Dodge Hornet PHEV

A new year means new vehicles sashaying into dealer showrooms. But for 2024, retro is in, with nostalgic nameplates like the Dodge Hornet and VW Bus proving everything old is new again. Between you and me, though, let’s leave the Cadillac Cimarron, Ford Edsel and anything remotely resembling a Yugo as footnotes to history. 

DODGE HORNET PHEV

$41,000

Electric-only range: 33 miles

MPG: 74 MPGe (electric/gas), 29 MPG (gas only)

0 to 60 mph: 5.6 seconds

Cargo room: 54.7 cu. ft. with rear seats down

PROS: Stylish, comfy, peppy

CONS: Snug, bit bouncy, pricey

IN A NUTSHELL: According to automotive lore, the first Hornet (1905-1906) was a short-lived, two-seat runabout from Horner & Sons. Then came the British-built Wolseley Hornet (1930-1936, and again 1960-1961). Next up, the Hudson Hornet (1951-1957), available as family sedan, coupe or convertible. The performance-oriented coupe—nicknamed “Fabulous Hudson Hornet”—would rule the world of stock-car racing and establish the Hornet’s daredevil image. AMC created its own Hornet (1970-1977), but this time for a blah compact car—a sibling to the butt-ugly Gremlin. To be fair, one of the best movie stunts ever is James Bond performing a corkscrew car jump over a Bangkok river while driving an AMC Hornet. 

Now, after a decades-long hiatus, Dodge has resurrected the Hornet name for its all-new subcompact SUV. While this latest Hornet debuted as a 2023 model with a gas engine, the buzz this year is the addition of a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV)—the first ever from Dodge.

The Hornet PHEV comes in two versions: R/T and R/T Plus. Both pack plenty of punch, with twice the horsepower of many competitors. Use the paddle shifters to activate the PowerShot system, which adds an extra 30 horses for even more oomph. Alas, this feature—which allows the Hornet to boast muscle-car acceleration—lasts only about 15 seconds before the system needs to cool down for another 15 seconds. 

But no matter the speed, the standard all-wheel drive and premium Brembo brakes keep everything under control. One handling complaint: Because of the short wheelbase, there is some annoying bobbing up and down over large potholes. 

Built on the same platform as a tony Alfa Romeo Tonale, the Hornet shares similar design cues, including chiseled side panels, narrow LED headlights and high roofline. But only the Hornet has two sleek, functional hood scoops. 

Inside, the Alfa ambience continues with a nicely sculpted dash, flat-bottom steering wheel and scooped-out center console. Even the door handles and infotainment system look the same in both vehicles. 

As with all hornets, beware the sting. In this case, it’s pricing: A fully loaded Hornet R/T Plus can easily approach $55,000. 

VOLKSWAGEN ID.BUZZ MICROBUS

$55,000 (est.)

Range: 260 miles

Fast-charge time: Up to 80% in 30 minutes 

0 to 60 mph: 7.5 seconds

Cargo room: 138 cu. ft.

PROS: Fun colors, fun styling, fun ride 

CONS: Limited appeal, limited production, limited trim level 

IN A NUTSHELL: Legend has it that a Dutch businessman sketched the VW van after visiting a Volkswagen plant in 1947. Two years later a prototype was built, and the first Microbus rolled off the production line in 1950. 

Production ceased in 2014, but only after countless variations were built—many with beds, sinks, tents, picnic furniture, surfboard racks and the like. This proud symbol of the counterculture hippie movement of the 1960s likely has been in more movies, TV shows, and magazine ads than there have been Grateful Dead concerts (2,300-plus so far, for all you Jerry Garcia fans). 

While technically a 2025 model, the all-electric VW ID.Buzz arrives later this year. The chassis is from the ID.4 electric crossover, but everything else is new. Groovy colors include Cabana Blue, Mahi Green, Pomelo Yellow, Energetic Orange and more. 

The space-age cabin has an “Orville” vibe, with a large 12.9-inch touchscreen hovering over the dash, 30-color ambient lighting and an expansive windshield. The accelerator even has an audio/video “Play” symbol engraved on the pedal, while the brake pedal is engraved with the “Pause” symbol. Too cute? Well, maybe… 

Two trim levels, but only the long-wheelbase model will be sold in the U.S. That means three rows of seats, with optional captain’s chairs in the second row. The front seats even come with a massage function. Oh, and the optional panoramic sunroof with electrochromic tint can change from opaque to clear with the swipe of your finger. Shagadelic, baby!

While the Dodge Hornet R/T can trace its lineage to at least one fast and fabulous forebear, fans of this new VW can thank generations of Deadheads for spreading the love about the original bus. But crank up the sublime 14-speaker Harman Kardon stereo, and this new VW suddenly channels another far-out ride: “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert.”

VW ID.Buzz Microbus
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