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Eat like a tourist

Treat yourself to a week of dining out

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staycation, gay news, Washington Blade

The Lafayette Room (Photo courtesy Hay-Adams)

Let’s face it: nobody really wants a staycation. However, sometimes getting away to a seaside cottage or plush Parisian pied-à-terre is just not in the cards. But if you’re going to stay home, then it’s worth making the most of it.

One way to make a staycation feel special is to give food a central focus, just as you would on a normal vacation. While D.C. is certainly in the midst of a culinary awakening, try heading off the beaten path to hotel restaurants — where you can also pretend you’re a guest — or unexpected hideaways, where you probably won’t run into your neighbors. Here’s a seven-day plan that will allow you to taste the good life without ever leaving the city limits.

Sunday: Brunch at Via Umbria (1525 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.). There’s a serious surprise behind the doors of Georgetown newcomer Via Umbria, an Italian market that boasts a wide array of specialty cheese, charcuterie and curated wines. Head upstairs for brunch in the sun-filled kitchen; for just $35, you’ll sit around the center island with other guests and sip on bottomless mimosas and Bloody Marys, while watching the resident chef whip up Italian specialties like cornetti alla crema, sfogliatelli, cacio e pepe, grilled vegetables and fresh fruit granita — depending on whatever’s fresh that day. The adjacent roof deck is also a nice place to steal away any other day of the week with a bottle of bubbly and a good book.

Monday: Afternoon snack at Blue Duck Tavern & Lounge (24th and M streets, N.W.). Voted one of the top 10 hotel restaurants in the United States by USA Today readers, this gem in the Park Hyatt feels like an escape from the everyday the moment you step into the lush lobby. Stop in for a snack or an early happy hour to try out its new line-up of matcha green tea-based beverages, with or without alcohol, from a refreshing iced matcha to an earthy twist on the gin and tonic that features housemade matcha tonic, made with grapefruit zest, yuzu juice and chinchona bark. Hint: ask about the homemade ice cream treats — you are on vacation, after all.

Tuesday: Pub lunch at the Alibi (237 2nd St., N.W. ). Hidden away in the shadow of the Department of Labor building, the Alibi is a charmingly renovated English pub that was delayed from getting a liquor license for nearly a year, but it was worth the wait. Luckily, they put that time to good use in crafting an authentic menu of steak pie, tikka masala, scotch eggs and perfectly crisped triple-cooked English chips — all of which is the right match for a wide range of draft beer and other libations to quaff your thirst. Even better, the Alibi offers a full vegan and vegetarian menu in addition to the traditional one, including vegetarian fish and chips and mushroom barbecue with a tart apple slaw. Don’t miss out on the banoffee pie for dessert.

Wednesday: Dinner at the Hay-Adams (800 16th St., N.W.). Mid-week during any vacation is a nice time for a special dinner, and the Hay-Adams offers absolute elegance in the Lafayette, its signature restaurant. You’ll be treated to superb service, with each plate showing off particular attention to detail, from Maine lobster salad with lemon curd sauce and trout roe to beef tenderloin with Madeira sauce and foie gras. Be sure to put in an order for pastry chef Josh Short’s vanilla soufflé, a light-as-air confection accompanied by a lightly tart blueberry sorbet that is, quite simply, summer on a plate. Insider’s advice: ask for Eli as your server.

Thursday: Picnic at Yards Park (355 Water St., S.E.). Weekends at this sunny spot along the Anacostia River can get pretty crowded, so plan a picnic for either lunch or dinner to get a prime spot with a view of both kayakers and herons. Another reason to head that way on a weekday is to grab exceptional sandwiches from Cornercopia (1000 3rd St., S.E.) a favorite of locals that is mostly only open on weekdays. Try the Green Line, made with homemade pesto, avocado, smoked gouda, tomato, onio, and dried cranberries, or the Capitol, a ciabatta roll filled with black forest ham, brie and sliced pears. Stop at the bottle shop at Bluejacket (300 Tingey St., S.E.) for bottles of beer to go, and snag a seat on the comfortable wooden lounge chairs under the trees at the end of 4th Street.

Friday: Poolside drinks at the Liaison (415 New Jersey Ave., N.W.) What’s a vacation without spending a day by the pool — and maybe a cabana boy bearing frosty drinks? The Liaison Hotel on Capitol Hill has a rooftop pool that offers day passes for just $35, so you can float all day while sipping on plenty of rum cocktails and noshing on pressed cheese toasties on fresh focaccia, hummus and veggies, and giant cookies stuffed with chocolate chips and pecans. Swimming ends at 5 p.m., but that’s when happy hour starts, so it’s a reasonable trade-off. If you really want to get the full vacation experience, considering renting an actual cabana for the day.

Saturday: Guilty pleasures at Esencias Panameñas (3322 Georgia Ave., N.W.). End your week by exploring the vibrant food of Panama at chef Yadira Stamp’s restaurant. In just its first year, Esencias Panameñas has developed a loyal following among Caribbean ex-pats from across the region, who line up around the block to sink their teeth into her  Sábados de Fritangas (“guilty pleasures”) brunch, which is served all day on Saturdays and from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sundays. It’s a decadent assortment of traditional goodies, from crispy corn fritters and twice-fried green plantains stuffed with ceviche to whole snapper in escobeche sauce — but the real draw is the homemade ice cream in flavors like grape nut, rum raisin and soursop, and chicheme frío, a delectation made of hominy corn, condensed milk and coconut milk. You won’t regret a mouthful.

 

Kristen Hartke is a D.C.-based food and beverage writer. Follow her kitchen adventures on Instagram.

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Dining

Restaurants have history as places for protest

ShutDownDC solicits tips for whereabouts of anti-Roe justices

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Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was the target of a recent protest at Morton’s Steakhouse. (Photo public domain)

Food is inherently political — including the spaces that serve them. Restaurants, as “third places” in the public arena (outside of home and work), are accessible and open, a convener of society. Politicians in D.C. have traditionally treated restaurants as a half-third space: a semi-private location outside of the office to conduct business, utilizing restaurants as an extension of their workspace. This public presence, however, implicitly invites the public in — and lawful protesters have taken note.

On July 6, the dimly lit downtown location of Morton’s The Steakhouse chain became a protest stakeout. According to media reports, Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was having dinner at the steakhouse when protesters learned of his whereabouts, convening a small demonstration.

The gathering was put together by an organization called ShutDownDC, which has called for peaceful action against the justices who voted for the Dobbs decision that overturned Roe v Wade. Politico reported that Kavanaugh may not have even seen or heard the protests, but he did leave before dessert.

And while the Supreme Court did not release a statement, the restaurant’s management was perturbed. It sent a statement to a Politico reporter noting:

“Honorable Supreme Court Justice Kavanaugh and all of our other patrons at the restaurant were unduly harassed by unruly protestors while eating dinner at our Morton’s restaurant. Politics, regardless of your side or views, should not trample the freedom at play of the right to congregate and eat dinner. There is a time and place for everything. Disturbing the dinner of all of our customers was an act of selfishness and void of decency.”

The response to Morton’s plea was swift and fierce. Commentators noted that protest is enshrined in the Constitution, while the right to eat dinner is not.

Notably, Morton’s The Steakhouse parent company is owned by billionaire Tilman Fertitta, who also owns the Houston Rockets. According to The Counter, Fertitta is one of Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott’s biggest donors, providing more than $100,000 annually since 2015. His family has given several hundred thousand dollars of donations to other Republican politicians, including President Trump.

After this protest, ShutDownDC stated on Twitter that it will offer up to $250 to industry staff for tips of the whereabouts of justices who voted for Dobbs.

This incident, however, was not the first time that citizens have engaged restaurants as a space for protest. Restaurants, as these third spaces, have offered fertile ground for previous demonstrations – especially during the Trump administration.

Washingtonian noted that one of the most infamous was against former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen at Mexican restaurant MXDC in 2018 during a controversy regarding DHS and treatment of migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexican border. Several other expressions of peaceful demonstrations against Trump officials took place during the rest of his term in office. Restaurant owners themselves are not immune to taking political action – during the 2020 Black Lives Matter movement, many restaurants offered food and other support.

During the tumultuous conclusion to that presidency, restaurants also had to contend with the specter of aggressive action. In preparation for what would turn out to be the Jan. 6 insurrection, many restaurants and other businesses closed their doors and fortified their exterior walls. In comparison to the peaceful restaurant protests, the Jan. 6 actions turned violent, denying restaurants revenue – and leaving many fearing for their safety.

Kavanaugh, meanwhile, was safely ensconced in his steakhouse, without fear of violence. Groups like ShutDownDC will continue to “use strategic direct action to advance justice and hold officials accountable,” according to its website, supporting nonviolent action in public places.

Anthony Aligo, a gay man and owner of wine bar Barkada, noted that, “This isn’t anything new. We believe everyone should be treated with respect and believe in the constitutional right to exercise your first amendment rights.”

This most recent event reinforces that restaurants, especially those known to harbor power lunches, must contend with the possibility of this type of protest. And leaders, when they decide to go out in these public spaces, must be aware that the people they represent also can be present there as well.

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Dining

Double dose of D.C. dining deals

Black Restaurant Week, RAMW Summer Restaurant Week return

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Derek Robinson, Falayn Ferrell and Warren Luckett. (Photo by Unique James)

D.C. is about to receive a double dose of dining destination deals over the next several weeks: Black Restaurant Week (July 18-31) and RAMW Summer Restaurant Week (August 15-21).

Black Restaurant Week

Founded in 2016, Black Restaurant Week is holding its third annual celebration of African-American, African, and Caribbean cuisine in the D.C. and Baltimore region July 18-31. During Black Restaurant Week, participating venues create their own promotions, rather than being constrained to a specific meal or prix-fixe menu.

For this iteration, BRW is partnering with the National Urban League Conference, and has extended the promotion from 10 days to 14. BRW, according to its founders, was developed to shine a light on minority businesses – aiding them in building community awareness to increase their bottom line. The mission: celebrate African-American, African, and Caribbean influences in the culinary industry, educating consumers on the abundance of cultural cuisines.

More than 100 restaurants are participating in the area. A short, non-comprehensive list includes 2 Southern Belles, All Set Restaurant & Bar, Austin Grill, Cloudy Donut, England Eatery, FishScale, Melange, Money Muscle BBQ, and Negril the Jamaican Eatery.

As part of the campaign, BRW hosts events to better bring together the dining community. The promotion begins with a Kickoff Mixer at The Delevate on July 19; other events include a happy hour, an open mic night, and a date night, all at different participating venues.

Black Restaurant Week has supported more than 2,000 restaurants, bars, bakeries, caterers, food trucks, and other culinary establishments across the country since the organization’s founding.

Kristal Williams, co-owner of Fishscale, says, “Black Restaurant Week provides an opportunity to discover and celebrate Black-owned restaurants and Black chef-owned establishments.”
Ferrell, one of the BRW co-founders, notes that, “during our Black Restaurant Week campaigns, we see an average of 15% to 20% increase in sales for participants, which helps tremendously as businesses are in a continual recovery status from the pandemic and as we are in an inflation season.”

She continued that, “Black Restaurant Week has an immediate financial impact with participants. The goal is to invest dollars back to the business. With our nonprofit organization, Feed the Soul Foundation, we have been able to provide $52,000 in financial support to Washington, D.C. and Baltimore-based, minority-owned culinary businesses.”
A full list of participants and more information can be found at blackrestaurantweeks.com.

RAMW Summer Restaurant Week

The semi-annual Summer Restaurant Week, run by the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington (RAMW), will take place Monday, Aug. 15, through Sunday, Aug. 21. The area’s signature summer dining promotion invites diners to experience regional restaurants in a variety of ways.

Participating restaurants will offer on-site multi-course brunch and lunch menus for $25 per person, and multi-course dinner menus for $40 or $55 per person. Many restaurants will also offer cocktail pairings.

Returning again this summer is the “RW-To-Go” dinner meals, available at two price points: $70 or $100 for two people and $140 or $200 for four people so that those uncomfortable with indoor dining can take the meal home.

“Diners across the region can look forward to what will be a delicious promotion celebrating the season’s summer flavors with menus at great price points,” says Kathy E. Hollinger, president and CEO of RAMW. “We have the return of the popular RW cocktail, wine, and mocktail pairings, as well as RW-To-Go dinner meals for diners who may want a great night out or picnic outdoors. This promotion is designed to give the most options for patrons as they dine their way around our great region.”

Restaurants stretching from Alexandria to Friendship Heights to Woodley Park are participating.

A number of 2022 RAMMY Awards Finalists are participating in the promotional dining week including Annabelle, Baan Siam, Blend 111, Bindaas Cleveland Park & Foggy Bottom, Bresca, China Chilcano, Convivial, Cranes, Dauphine’s, La Bise, La Cote D’Or Cafe, Mintwood Place, Modena, Nama, Slate Wine Bar, Rasika, Rasika West End, and Sababa. The 2022 RAMMY Awards will take place on July 31.

New participating restaurants include Annabelle, Dolce Vita, Dovetail Bar & Restaurant at the Viceroy, and Il Piatto.

Longtime participant Alan Popovsky, co-founder and principal of PRG Hospitality (Lincoln Restaurant, Teddy & the Bully Bar), says that “for our downtown locations, Restaurant Week provides an opportunity to make new guest relationships and fortify our existing ones. It’s essential in our industry today.”

A full list of participants and more information can be found at ramw.org/restaurantweek.

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Crazy Aunt Helen’s to host ‘Pride-a-palooza’

Barracks Row restaurant celebrating all month long

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Crazy Aunt Helen’s ‘serves American comfort food with a southern slant.’ (Washington Blade file photo by Michael Key)

Shane Mayson’s restaurant is as colorful as his language. His multi-hued American eatery Crazy Aunt Helen’s debuted last July on Barracks Row, just a few days after Pride concluded. But as Pride is 365, this restaurant has spent its first year with flair and fanfare, and this June, Mayson, who identifies as gay, isn’t holding back.

“I LOVE PRIDE MONTH,” Mayson wrote (caps are his). “I love everything we have at Crazy Aunt Helen’s for Pride. Check out our events and get blown away,” he says.

This isn’t Mayson’s first Pride – but it is his first as owner of Crazy Aunt Helen’s, a delightfully fabulous neighborhood restaurant in Barracks Row.  

Thus far in June, Mayson has already held comedy shows, book readings, a ladies’ tea dance, play readings, bingo, and a Story District event. Coming up on June 25, to end Pride month with even more color, is “Pride-a-palooza,” featuring a host of drag queens, food, drinks, prizes, and plenty of surprises that MayD.C. Mayor Muriel Bowserson has been waiting an entire year to showcase.

Crazy Aunt Helen’s “serves American comfort food with a southern slant,” explains Mayson. Taking over the space of Irish pub Finn McCool’s, Crazy Aunt Helen’s spreads over two floors, plus a patio and streatery. The interior is wildly bright: a Prince-esque purple host stand and staircase welcome guests, and a highlighter-green wooden banquette runs the length of the dining room. A set of wicker chairs and flower-print cushions recall that southern influence.

Mayson enlisted Pixie Windsor – the very same of eponymous Miss Pixie’s – to design the restaurant (the two have been friends for years). “Pixie has a way with creating fabulous comfortable spaces,” Mayson says. 

Windsor and Mayson partnered to craft the whimsical aesthetic, from the brilliant paint job to a bright-pink neon sign.

Mayson is quick to note that his Aunt Helen “was charming, warm, and funny, with an amazing laugh, and I wanted my restaurant to have that same feeling,” he says. “I wanted our guests to feel like they are getting a big’ol hug each time they walk in the doors.” 

The menu is just as homey and eclectic. Mayson waxes poetic about the fried green tomatoes, the chicken fried steak smothered in chicken sausage gravy, and a Jewish-style braised brisket. Yet many of the dishes are also vegan and vegetarian, like the “fab” cakes made of soy and mushroom and a vegan steak.

As for the drinks, Mayson says that the “signature cocktails are also seasonally driven, and I only use local distilleries like Republic Restoratives, another LGBTQIA business.” There’s also a list of beer, wine, and zero-proof drinks.

Mayson has been in the restaurant business since he moved to D.C. in 1984, working first at Mr. Henry’s on Capitol Hill, and most recently as director of business development for the restaurant group of the highly lauded restaurant industry leader, and lesbian, Jamie Leeds.

Mayson is using Pride this year as Crazy Aunt Helen’s coming out, both as a restaurant and a safe space. “I can say that I have had experiences in my life where I didn’t feel welcomed places. The staff and I work very hard to make sure everyone who walks into Crazy Aunt Helen’s feels welcome,” he says.

“I find it’s the small things that build to allow folks to feel safe,” he notes. There’s no required uniform, allowing staff to dress however they feel most comfortable. Mayson also makes an effort to support local LGBTQ artists and performers, giving them space in the second-floor Peacock Room to share their talents.

To that end, Mayson is offering The Rainbow Theatre Project, a theater group that has been dark since pandemic closings, a home until they are back up and running. During June, they performed four staged readings from four LGBTQ playwrights. “I can’t wait to have the Peacock Room buzzing with entertainment every night of the week and to hear all the people laughing and enjoying the food, each other and the show,” Mayson says.

Mayson’s goal at Crazy Aunt Helen’s is twofold: create a space “that’s welcoming and nourishing to both our bellies and our spirits.”

Shane Mayson (Photo courtesy of Mayson)

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