Connect with us

News

Bolton opposes Uganda, Nigeria anti-gay laws

Possible 2016 GOP contender has taken stand in support of marriage equality

Published

on

John Bolton, George W. Bush, Bush Administration, Republican Party, CPAC, Conservative Political Action Conference, gay news, Washington Blade

Former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton opposes anti-gay laws in Nigeria and Uganda. (Photo by Gage Skidmore; courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — Former U.S. ambassador to the United States John Bolton said on Thursday he opposes recently passed anti-gay laws in Uganda and Nigeria, extending bipartisan opposition to measures already condemned by the Obama administration.

Bolton spoke briefly about the laws when asked for his thoughts by the Washington Blade in the halls of the Gaylord Convention Center during the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference.

“Well, I’m opposed to them, but I’m not in the middle of an interview,” Bolton said before walking off.

The Nigeria law makes entering into a same-sex marriage or civil union punishable by up to 14 years in prison, and membership in an LGBT organization is punishable with jail time of up to 10 years. The Uganda law makes certain homosexual acts punishable with life in prison in addition to making illegal not reporting gay people to the police.

Although Bolton, who served as U.S. envoy to the United Nations under President George W. Bush, is viewed as a conservative, he’s taken a strong stand in favor of gay rights. Last year, he told the National Review he supports marriage equality “at both the state level and the federal level.”

“Gay marriage is something I’ve thought about at length as I’ve looked at my future,” Bolton was quoted as saying. “I concluded, a couple years ago, that I think it should be permissible and treated the same at both levels.”

During his speech at CPAC, Bolton lambasted President Obama for his foreign policy, calling him “our biggest national security crisis.”

“We can and must replace the Obama/Clinton/Kerry/Biden doctrine,” he said. “That is the key to success this November and in 2016 and that is the key to ensuring America’s freedom and security in the years ahead.”

As the National Review noted, Bolton is considered a possible Republican presidential candidate in 2016.

Mark Bromley, chair of the pro-LGBT Council for Global Equality, praised Bolton for speaking out against the anti-gay laws.

“I think this shows that even conservative Republicans have come to see anti-gay legislation in countries like Uganda, Nigeria and Russia as an affront to fundamental rights and democratic societies,” Bromley said. “I hope they will explain their views to U.S. audiences that still don’t fully understand the extent to which anti-LGBT campaigns overseas serve to embolden foreign dictators who are likely to oppose broader U.S. global interests.”

Advertisement
FUND LGBTQ JOURNALISM
SIGN UP FOR E-BLAST

Congress

Avoiding a shutdown looks likely as House clears bipartisan spending bill

45-day continuing resolution passed 335-91.

Published

on

U.S. House Minority Leader Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) (Screen capture/PBS News)

The U.S. House on Saturday approved a 45-day continuing resolution that, should the Senate approve the stopgap measure, as expected, will avert a government shutdown.

In a stunning turn of events, a coalition of Republicans and Democrats backed the proposal, H.R. 5860 advanced by House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), which was passed with a vote of 335-91.

Ninety Republicans and one Democrat voted against the continuing resolution which, in addition to funding U.S. government agencies through mid-November, will provide billions in disaster relief .

Screenshot/C-SPAN

Democrats agreed to the bill even though it did not contain U.S. aid to Ukraine. Still, the most conservative members of McCarthy’s caucus have warned they would replace their speaker if he cooperated with Democrats on a deal to avoid a shutdown.

In recent weeks, these members advanced far-right anti-LGBTQ amendments to spending packages that stood no chance of becoming law.

Continue Reading

Africa

Eswatini government refuses to allow LGBTQ rights group to legally register

Supreme Court previously ruled in favor of Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities

Published

on

Members of the Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities, an LGBTQ and intersex rights group, after the Eswatini Supreme Court on May 5, 2023, heard arguments in their case in support of legally registering in the country. (Photo courtesy of Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities)

The Eswatini Commerce, Industry and Trade Ministry this week said it will not allow an LGBTQ rights group to register.

The country’s Supreme Court in June ruled the government must allow Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities to register.

The Registrar of Companies in 2019 denied the group’s request. Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities the following year petitioned the Supreme Court to hear their case. The Supreme Court initially ruled against the group, but it appealed the decision.

“[The] Minister of Commerce and Trade refuses to register ESGM citing the ‘Roman Dutch Law,'” said Eswatini Sexual and Gender Minorities on Thursday in a tweet to its X account. “This was after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously that the refusal to register ESGM by the registrar was unconstitutional.”

Continue Reading

Virginia

Virginia Beach high school students stage walkouts to support transgender rights

City’s school board approved policy to out trans students to parents

Published

on

Transgender flags (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key.)

Students at five Virginia Beach high schools on Friday staged walkouts in support of transgender rights.

The walkout is in response to the Virginia Beach School Board approving policy 5-31, which the Pride Liberation Project says will require schools to out trans students to their parents.

Students have been organizing walkouts across the state since Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin earlier this year announced new guidelines for trans and nonbinary students.

“Students like me aren’t going to be able to talk to our teachers if we’re constantly worried about our school officials calling home to forcibly out us,” AJ, a trans Kellam High School Student, told the Pride Liberation Project.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Sign Up for Weekly E-Blast

Follow Us @washblade

Advertisement

Popular