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“Rainbow White House.” Following the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges that legalized same-sex marriage across the country, the White House was illuminated in rainbow colors on June 26, 2015. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

The Washington Blade is offering for sale limited edition historic photos from our nearly 50-year archive. We’ve selected 25 of our favorite photos and are offering just 10 copies of each, hand numbered and printed on museum-quality paper. (Photos are shipped unframed.) Proceeds benefit the Washington Blade Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit.

The photos are below. To purchase, email [email protected]; indicate the name of the photo and the size you’d like and a Blade staffer will call to confirm and take payment.

“I Love My Gay Uncles,” Gay Pride Day in D.C., June 20, 1993. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Showing Pride.” A scene from the Gay Pride Parade in D.C., June 1997. (Washington Blade photo by Clint Steib)
“Hillary Arrives.” Hillary Clinton snapped in the back of a limousine during the inauguration of husband Bill Clinton, Jan. 20, 1993. (Washington Blade photo by Phoenix)
I Love My Daughter and She’s Gay.” A supportive mom photographed in front of the White House at a Gay & Lesbian Activists Alliance-sponsored protest. Date Unknown. (Washington Blade photo by Kevin Yum)
“Kinsey.” D.C. Mayor Marion Barry, an early supporter of gay rights, with pioneering gay activist Frank Kameny at Gay Pride Day, June 10, 1979. (Washington Blade photo by John M. Yanson)
“Jeep.” Two men photographed at Gay Pride Day on June 24, 1982. (Washington Blade photo by Leigh Mosley)
“Celebrate.” A scene from the legendary dance club Tracks taken during the New Year’s Eve party on Jan. 1, 1985. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Black Pride.” Two men embrace during Black Gay Pride Day, May 28, 1994. (Washington Blade photo by Kristi Gasaway)
“AIDS Walkathon.” Marchers on the National Mall during the AIDS Walk on May 15, 1988. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Color Guard.” In a historic first, the U.S. Department of Defense Armed Forces Color Guard marched in the 39th annual Capital Pride Parade on June 7, 2014. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
A participant in an ACT UP civil disobedience action at the National Institutes of Health on April 21, 1990. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Mowhawk.” A participant in an ACT UP civil disobedience action at the National Institutes of Health on April 21, 1990. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Miller Beer Boycott.” July 27, 1990. ACT UP D.C. initiated a boycott of Philip Morris and its subsidiary Miller Beer over the parent company’s financial contributions to the re-election campaign of anti-gay Sen. Jesse Helms. Patrons of gay bars dumped cans of Miller Beer into the streets in protest. The boycott ended in 1991 after Philip Morris agreed to double its donations to AIDS-related charities. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Look Out!” In this undated photo, D.C. first responders are warned that residents of certain homes are suffering from AIDS. (Washington Blade archive photo)
“Three Men and a Parade.” A scene from Gay Pride Day, June 16, 1985. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Kissing Booth.” A scene from D.C.’s first Gay Pride Day, June 15, 1975. The photographer is unknown, as some Blade contributors from this era declined to use their names or worked under pseudonyms.
“Pride No. 2.” Participants dance during D.C.’s second annual Gay Pride Day, held on June 20, 1976. Photographer unknown.
“Condom House.” D.C. gay activists covered the home of anti-gay Sen. Jesse Helms in a giant condom on Sept. 5, 1991. Emblazoned on the front was the message: “A condom to stop unsafe politics. Helms is deadlier than a virus.” (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Night Vigil.” The Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool in a scene from the AIDS Candlelight Vigil held on Oct. 8, 1988. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Quilt Returns.” The Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt debuted on the National Mall on Oct. 11, 1987, as part of the National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights. Due to its overwhelming impact, it returned to D.C. on Oct. 8, 1988 as part of a 20-city national tour that raised $500,000 for AIDS service organizations. This image is from the 1988 display, when the Quilt consisted of 8,288 panels and was displayed on the Ellipse in front of the White House. (Washington Blade photo by Doug Hinckle)
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Don’t Exist No More.” President Barack Obama signs the bill repealing the military’s longstanding gay ban known as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” on Dec. 21, 2010. At the 2016 White House Pride reception, Obama quipped, “Today we live in an America where ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’ don’t exist no more.” (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
“Hillary Makes History.” Hillary Clinton accepts the Democratic Party’s nomination for president at the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. In her speech, Clinton referenced LGBT Americans, noting, “We will defend all our rights — civil rights, human rights and voting rights, women’s rights and workers’ rights, LGBT rights and the rights of people with disabilities.” (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
“Black Lesbian Feminist and Lesbian Democrat.” Gwen Craig and Yvonne King Kennedy were gay delegates on the floor of Madison Square Garden at the Democratic National Convention, July 1992. (Washington Blade photo by Lisa Keen)
President Obama smiles for a sea of cell phone cameras during the White House Pride Reception on June 13, 2013. Obama hosted a June Pride reception each year of his presidency. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
“All Smiles.” President Obama smiles for a sea of cell phone cameras during the White House Pride Reception on June 13, 2013. Obama hosted a June Pride reception each year of his presidency. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
“I Do.” A mass wedding was held in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on June 21, 2013. Participants were bussed in from states that banned same-sex marriage to legally wed in D.C., a jurisdiction that enacted marriage equality years before the 2015 Supreme Court ruling. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)
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PHOTOS: Summer Kickoff Party

Washington Blade holds annual event at The Pines in Rehoboth Beach

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Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester shares a laugh with Blade Editor Kevin Naff at the Summer Kickoff Party on Saturday. (Blade photo by Daniel Truitt)

The Washington Blade held its 15th annual Summer Kickoff Party at The Pines in Rehoboth Beach, Del. on Friday, May 20 with special guest Congresswoman Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-Del.).

(Washington Blade photos by Daniel Truitt)

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PHOTOS: Worthy Mentoring Pride Brunch

Carson Kressley serves as emcee for LGBTQ fundraiser

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Carson Kressley serves as the emcee for the Worthy Mentoring Pride Brunch. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

Carson Kressley of “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” and “RuPaul’s Drag Race” served as the emcee for the Worthy Mentoring Pride Brunch at the Four Seasons Washington Hotel on Sunday, May 22. Worthy Mentoring is a nonprofit that connects mentors and mentees in the LGBTQ+ community through a mobile iOS and Android App.

(Washington Blade photos by Michael Key)

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PHOTOS: Miss Freddie’s 2022

Brooklyn Heights wins the coveted crown

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Brooklyn Heights of Baltimore, Md. is crowned Miss Freddie's 2022. (Washington Blade photo by Michael Key)

The Miss Freddie’s drag pageant returned in-person this year to Freddie’s Beach Bar & Restaurant in Arlington, Va. on Friday, May 20. Six contestants vied for the crown, but the “Pandemic Queen,” Tatiyanna Voche’ (Miss Freddie’s 2020 and 2021) passed on her crown to Brooklyn Heights of Baltimore, Md. following talent, beachwear, “Met Gala-inspired looks,” and on-stage question categories of competition. Chasity Vain and Deja Diamond Jemaceye placed second and third respectively.

Patti Lovelace was crowned Miss Freddie’s Emeritus as voted upon unanimously by the former Miss Freddies.

“First Lady of Freddie’s” and the Washington Blade’s Best of Gay D.C. “Best Drag Queen” of 2015 Destiny B. Childs served as emcee alongside former Miss Freddie’s Monet Dupree.

(Washington Blade photos by Michael Key)

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